The Bulgarian ethnographer Vasil Kanchov, who was he?

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  • Daskalot
    Senior Member
    • Sep 2008
    • 4345

    The Bulgarian ethnographer Vasil Kanchov, who was he?

    I am starting this thread so we can accumulate documents in regards to the Bulgarian ethnographer Vasil Kanchov.

    He published a book in 1900 called "Macedonia — ethnography and statistics". Albeit Macedonians were denoted as Bulgarians in this book and on the including map.

    What is very interesting is that in 1911 he published a book called "Orohydrography of Macedonia" in which he himself refutes the fact that the Bulgarians of Macedonia did not consider themselves Bulgarians but rather Macedonians only.

    Title page.

    First page.


    Here is the important passage on page one translated into English:
    It is impossible to give precise borders of the area of Macedonia, since this country is not limited with some strict geographic features, nor is it administratively separated by the other countries. Only in the ethnographic sense Macedonia has defined borders, since the Bulgarian tribe is settled in the entire country, and rarely exits its limits. The areas to the north, west and south of Macedonia have predominantly other population. To determine its borders we will follow mainly the main perception of the population and the determination given by the most skilled recent travelers. The local Bulgarians and Kucovlachs who live in the area of Macedonia call themselves Macedonians, and the surrounding nations call them Macedonians. Turks and Albanians from Macedonia do not call themselves Macedonians, but when asked where they are from, they respond: from Macedonia... also Greeks who live in the southern area of Macedonia, do not call themselves Macedonians...
    Greeks form Macedonia do not call themselves Macedonians........
    Macedonian Truth Organisation
  • Serdarot
    Member
    • Feb 2010
    • 605

    #2
    hehe, nice1 Daskale, i know the begining of the quoted material, but never searched for the book to check it completely.

    and the vulgaroi always used short quotes "prooving" their stupid theories.
    ----------

    btw, he is very big enigma for me, couse in his biografy it writes he used to travel a lot in Macedonia, but his descriptions...

    like example, in his first publications, the City of Bitola has 1 river, Dragora...

    The problem is Bitola had 2 rivers, Dragor and Kurdelec. Kurdelec was covered - destroed by the communist after the ww2, actualy i think it was the 70s.

    Someone gives in his work the number of the houses of some city, but fail to notice the city has 2 rivers?

    So i guess i have to find and read more of his works, to have better picture about him.
    Bratot:
    Никој не е вечен, а каузава не е нова само е адаптирана на новите услови и ќе се пренесува и понатаму.

    Comment

    • Epirot
      Member
      • Mar 2010
      • 399

      #3
      Keep up the good work Daskalot!

      Is there anything more about Albanians by Vasil Kanchov?

      I ask because a friend of mine who know Macedonian translate to me some passages of G. Pulevski. If I am correct Pulevski did not see Albanians and Macedonians (of his time) as two distinct people. He noticed some similarity between two ethnic groups. Is that true?
      IF OUR CHRONICLES DO NOT LIE, WE CALL OURSELVES AS EPIROTES!

      Comment

      • Mastika
        Member
        • Feb 2010
        • 503

        #4
        Originally posted by Epirot View Post
        Keep up the good work Daskalot!

        Is there anything more about Albanians by Vasil Kanchov?

        I ask because a friend of mine who know Macedonian translate to me some passages of G. Pulevski. If I am correct Pulevski did not see Albanians and Macedonians (of his time) as two distinct people. He noticed some similarity between two ethnic groups. Is that true?
        Vasil Kanchov has written approx. 16 pages worth of Information about Albanians (Arnauts as he calls them) in his book Macedonia Ethnography and Statistics. He gives statistics of where the Albanians lived 100 years ago and gives some details regarding the colonisation of many parts of Macedonia by Albanians during the centuries long Ottoman Rule.

        He doesn't shy away from history, he mentions the expulsion of Macedonians from the region south of Ohrid by Ali Pasha at the turn of the 19th century. he also talks about the Devoll region of Albania, which 150 years ago was full of both Macedonian and Albanian villages. All of the Macedonians were assimilated/fled due to conflict. His early history about the Albanians supports the idea that the ethnic boundary between the two peoples has slowly been moving East across the centuries. Once upon a time the ethnic boundary was West of Korca, by 1900 Albanians were on all sides of the Prespa and Ohrid lakes. Some even on the other sides near Lerin and Bitola, however these Albanians originate from Colonists from Albania.

        For example, In his time the Macedonians and Macedonians Muslims near Peshkopia were already begginging to speak Albanian and identify as such.

        He actually has written a lot about them, it depends on what you are looking for i guess. As always you have to look for the bias, which it is rife with.

        Comment

        • GStojanov
          Junior Member
          • Mar 2010
          • 69

          #5
          From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasil_Kanchov

          Vasil Kanchov was born in Vratsa. Upon graduating from High school in Lom, Bulgaria, he entered the University of Harkov, then in Russia. During the Serbo-Bulgarian War 1885 he suspended his education and took part in the war. Later, he went on to pursue studies at universities in Munich and Stuttgart, but in 1888 he interrupted his education again due to an illness.

          In the following years Kanchov was a Bulgarian teacher in Macedonia. He was a teacher in the Bulgarian Men's High School of Thessaloniki (1888–1891), a director of Bulgarian schools in Serres district (1891–1892), a headmaster of Bulgarian Men's High School of Thessaloniki (1892–1893), а chief school inspector of the Bulgarian schools in Macedonia (1894–1897).

          After 1898 Kanchov returned to Bulgaria and went into politics. In the beginning of 1902 he became an educational minister of Bulgaria, but was killed in his office by psychopath.

          He travelled extensively after 1888, visiting and researching all over Macedonia.

          So he was extremely well informed on the situation in Macedonia, since he visited each and every town, and many if not all, villages in Macedonia during his School Inspectorship. He naturaly was compelled to label all Macedonians as Bulgarians. It may have been his personal conviction, or it may have been just his obligation as an employee of the Bulgarian Exachate. But as a scientists, he was honest enough to admit that Macedonians do not self identify themselves as Bulgarians (or Serbs or Greeks) but simply as Macedonians (wihouth any additions or substrations), and that all the surrounding nations identify them as Macedonians. (He also mentioned that Greeks in Macedonia do not self identify themselves as Macedonians).

          This is a remarkable find, and the credit goes to our brothers from Pirin Macedonia, form the newspaper www.narodnavolja.com, who discovered and published this few years ago. This is so big that it undermines the entire bulgarian propaganda. The leading bulgarian propagandist (thats who Kanchov was, since he was the Chief School Inspector in Macedonia for four years, in the most delicate period of the Macedonian Revival 1894–1897) admits that in spite of all his and Exarchate's efforst, and many milions of levs, drachmas and denars spent on propaganda, Macedonians still prefer to self identify themselves as Macedonians.

          As to Epirotes question, Kanchov does mention Albanians as a separate nation, and they are included in his census. I can dig up some data for you if you want. But you are correct that the real ethnic border between Albanians and Macedonians was somewhat blurred. There were a number of people (villages) that were bilingual. By the toponims it looks like the Albanian language and culture was steadily advancing into the Macedonian (slavic speaking) teritory since the medieval times. The area of Matia, for example, now deeply in Albania, was known to be Slavic speaking.

          Comment

          • makedonin
            Senior Member
            • Sep 2008
            • 1668

            #6
            Compliments to the Daskale and the people of www.narodnavolja.com.

            Originally posted by Epirot View Post
            I ask because a friend of mine who know Macedonian translate to me some passages of G. Pulevski. If I am correct Pulevski did not see Albanians and Macedonians (of his time) as two distinct people. He noticed some similarity between two ethnic groups. Is that true?
            He was distinguishing between those who today are known as Albanians.

            The Tosks he saw as some Fokians, the Arnauts he saw as shqipers, and the Ghegs from Macedonia who he saw as muslimized Mijaks. He says that the language of the Arnauts and the Tosks is very different, and this difference is even greater cause the Tosks have greek loan words.

            He tells that the muslimized Mijaks came from Dolna Reka in Debar vicinity, and at the beginning they had two leaders, Suljo Garne from Vele Brdo and Shaban Gega from Pristojnica, from 1820 till 1835.

            They were acctually leaders of the Gegi bashibouzuk. He also states that this Gegi bashibouzuk have plundered the churches of the Sveta Gora (Hilendar) and the holy items were all handed over to the Mijaks, their brothers.

            How much that all is true is uncertain!
            To enquire after the impression behind an idea is the way to remove disputes concerning nature and reality.

            Comment

            • Epirot
              Member
              • Mar 2010
              • 399

              #7
              Originally posted by Mastika View Post
              He gives statistics of where the Albanians lived 100 years ago and gives some details regarding the colonisation of many parts of Macedonia by Albanians during the centuries long Ottoman Rule.
              Anyway, not all of his statements should be taken seriously since he saw things from Bulgarian angle. Albanian colonisation as an expression is it hard to sustain since no literary record speaks of any influx en masse of Albanians into Macedonia. If modern Albanians represent some remnants of ancient Illyrians (Ghegs) and Epirots (Tosks) there is no room for inventing an Albanian "colonisation" of Macedonia.
              It is well-attested Illyrian presence in most of western territories in Macedonia. The only "colonisation" that can be taken seriously is moving of some Albanians in some North-Western districts of today's Bulgaria.
              There are some traces of an Albanian immigration toward Bulgaria as many indications proof it:

              Catholic settlers

              Some of the earliest Albanian settlers in modern Bulgaria were the Roman Catholic ore miners in Kopilovtsi, Montana Province, a village in the vicinity of the larger mining centre Chiprovtsi. Kopilovtsi was settled between the 15th and the 17th century; a Catholic church was built in the early 17th century. Unlike the Catholic population in other villages of the region, Kopilovtsi's residents were of Albanian origin. In 1626, the Archbishop of Bar Pietro Masarechi claims that part of the Bulgarian Catholics are Albanians (Albanesi), Saxons and Paulicians. According to Bulgarian bishop Petar Bogdan, Kopilovtsi had 1,200 Catholics of Albanian origin who were still speaking the Albanian language in 1640. In another report from 1647, Petar Bogdan also lists 1,200 Albanian Catholics in Kopilovtsi, but notes that they have started using Slavic instead. By 1658, Petar Bogdan notes that the over 1,500 Albanians in Kopilovtsi spoke Bulgarian and only retained some traces of their original language. Kopilovtsi, along with Chiprovtsi, was depopulated with the crushing of the Chiprovtsi Uprising in 1688.[2]


              Orthodox settlers
              Albanian settlement in northern Bulgaria was not limited to Catholics—in a 1595 letter to the Prince of Transylvania, Ragusan merchant Pavel Đorđić notes that "in Bulgaria there are many villages inhabited by Albanians, from where 7,000 brave and well-trained men can be rallied". In the same letter, Đorđić claims that 1,500 of those Albanians lived near Tarnovo.[3]
              Indeed, the toponym Arbanasi, a village near the city of Tarnovo, is a hint at Albanian settlement in the region. Arbanasi was populated (or repopulated) in the late 15th century and as an administratively autonomous village in the Ottoman Empire attracted many settlers. It is theorized that the first settlers were around 100–200 Albanians who were brought there during Bayezid II's campaigns in Albania. These settlers were gradually Hellenized and Bulgarianized in the following centuries.[4]
              Other places in northern Bulgaria where an Albanian presence has been strongly suggested are Chervena Voda near Rousse, Poroishte near Razgrad, Dobrina near Provadia and Devnya near Varna.[5] Albanians have been registered in the modern Bulgarian capital Sofia since the early 17th century; other possible colonies south of the Balkan Mountains included Gorno Arbanasi and Dolno Arbanasi near Asenovgrad.[6] The most notable Albanian village in Bulgarian Thrace is Mandritsa near Ivaylovgrad, which was settled in the first half of the 17th century by settlers from near Kor็๋. A church was built in 1718.[7] The village reached its demographic peak before the Balkan Wars; in 1912, it was inhabited by 1,879 people.[8]
              Originally posted by Mastika

              He doesn't shy away from history, he mentions the expulsion of Macedonians from the region south of Ohrid by Ali Pasha at the turn of the 19th century. he also talks about the Devoll region of Albania, which 150 years ago was full of both Macedonian and Albanian villages. All of the Macedonians were assimilated/fled due to conflict.
              I am somehow dubious for such occurrence since as far I know for Ali Pasha's period there is no expulsion of Macedonians. It is true that there were some conflicts between some Vlachs pastoral communities and Ali Pasha's government but this was true as well as for Albanians since Ali Pasha's cruelty had no boundary. He behaved bad even to his Albanian followers. There are many cases when Albanian villages were forced to move on in order to safe from Ali's repercussions.

              Originally posted by Mastika

              Once upon a time the ethnic boundary was West of Korca, by 1900 Albanians were on all sides of the Prespa and Ohrid lakes. Some even on the other sides near Lerin and Bitola, however these Albanians originate from Colonists from Albania.
              This cannot be sustain since earlier Byzantine accounts makes known that Albanians lived in Ohrid and some regions in upper Haliacmon.

              Originally posted by Mastika

              For example, In his time the Macedonians and Macedonians Muslims near Peshkopia were already begginging to speak Albanian and identify as such.
              Reference please?
              IF OUR CHRONICLES DO NOT LIE, WE CALL OURSELVES AS EPIROTES!

              Comment

              • Onur
                Senior Member
                • Apr 2010
                • 2389

                #8
                The local Bulgarians and Kucovlachs who live in the area of Macedonia call themselves Macedonians, and the surrounding nations call them Macedonians. Turks and Albanians from Macedonia do not call themselves Macedonians, but when asked where they are from, they respond: from Macedonia... also Greeks who live in the southern area of Macedonia, do not call themselves Macedonians...

                This should be the truth. My grandmother always told us same for Petrich at pre-1913 era. She was always telling us that the christians in that town was Macedonians. She never told us like they were Bulgars. If these people would identify themselves as Bulgars, then my grandmother would say us that they were Bulgars. Also whenever someone asked her about where she was from, she was telling us that she is from Macedonia. And you know, Petrich is in far north, so close to Bulgar populated areas. So, if the people in Petrich considered themselves as Macedonians, then there is no way that the people at southern sides would have been identified themselves as Bulgars either.

                Also whenever she gets a bit nervous or joyous, she was starting to speak in a language which was foreign to me or speaking in Turkish with foreign words. When i asked her like "what are you telling me, i don't understand. Whats this language?". Then she was responding like "Makedonca" in Turkish, so "Macedonian language".







                Originally posted by Epirot View Post
                It is true that there were some conflicts between some Vlachs pastoral communities and Ali Pasha's government but this was true as well as for Albanians since Ali Pasha's cruelty had no boundary. He behaved bad even to his Albanian followers. There are many cases when Albanian villages were forced to move on in order to safe from Ali's repercussions.

                You guys talking about the rebellious Albanian Ali pasha? Later killed by the Sultan`s order because of his actions?

                Comment

                • Daskalot
                  Senior Member
                  • Sep 2008
                  • 4345

                  #9
                  Originally posted by Onur View Post
                  Also whenever she gets a bit nervous or joyous, she was starting to speak in a language which was foreign to me or speaking in Turkish with foreign words. When i asked her like "what are you telling me, i don't understand. Whats this language?". Then she was responding like "Makedonca" in Turkish, so "Macedonian language".
                  Do you remember any of the words? If your grandmother is alive, could you ask her to tell you some words in Makedonca?
                  Macedonian Truth Organisation

                  Comment

                  • Onur
                    Senior Member
                    • Apr 2010
                    • 2389

                    #10
                    Originally posted by Daskalot View Post
                    Do you remember any of the words? If your grandmother is alive, could you ask her to tell you some words in Makedonca?

                    She passed away at 1993 but i remember few words;

                    draska; for something big, huge(and she was saying "Drazman" for tall and fat men, "katana" for tall and fat women )
                    gushtiri OR gushturi; lizard like animal
                    pisha; pee, piss
                    kopcha; pants or shirt button
                    neshmasha OR neshmishi; for clumsy person
                    selenka OR selanka; villager, hick
                    sedankah; she was using this when we were going to visit our relatives. Probably it`s something like "meeting, visit", not sure.



                    Thats all i remember atm. I still use draska and kopcha myself and my brother and sister too I tried to write those with english pronunciation but maybe it`s wrong, i am not sure... My uncle knows many more words and expressions than me, i gotta ask him when i see
                    Last edited by Onur; 08-03-2010, 05:51 PM.

                    Comment

                    • GStojanov
                      Junior Member
                      • Mar 2010
                      • 69

                      #11
                      Onur,

                      You remembered them well. That is exactly how you would say lizard or button or clumsy in South-Eastern dialect of Macedonian:

                      Here is the standard Macedonian (almost the same):

                      gushter - lizard
                      kopche - button
                      nesmasen - clumsy
                      selanka - female villager (often derogatory)
                      draska though is a scratch. It may be a local word of the Pirin dialects that I'm not familiar with.
                      Pisha is a common word for Pirin dialects and it does mee pee. Standard word is mocha.

                      Good memory. May your grandma rest in peace, and God bless her for remembering these Macedonian words and teaching her offspring of their past and culture...

                      Comment

                      • Onur
                        Senior Member
                        • Apr 2010
                        • 2389

                        #12
                        Originally posted by GStojanov View Post
                        Onur,

                        Good memory. May your grandma rest in peace, and God bless her for remembering these Macedonian words and teaching her offspring of their past and culture...

                        Thanks for your kind words GStojanov. I remember these words cuz we still use it and my grandparents was from the first wave of immigrants who escaped because of Balkan war but most of 1960s immigrants and their kids can speak Macedonian.



                        I remembered one more word ;

                        Pishkir; for a piece of cloth to clean something

                        Comment

                        • GStojanov
                          Junior Member
                          • Mar 2010
                          • 69

                          #13
                          Yea, peshkir (or piskir in the south-western Macedonian dialect) means a towel.

                          My father has a close friend that moved to Izmir. They actually came and visited us. They used to teach in the same school (my father was a math teacher, and afterwards the pricipal of the school, and this man was teaching Turkish, the school was multiethnic as many schools in Macedonia still are).

                          We still have a Turkish minority, it is second only to Albanians, and unlike Albanians (which I must say are often unloyal) the Turkish minority is very well integrated and extremely loyal. I remember when I was in High School they asked us to volunteer to dig ditches to bring water for two turkish villages that were high in the mountains. We volunteered for five Sundays, until we completed the project (around 8 miles of ditches).

                          I also remember that the best looking girl in my generation (High School) was also Turkish.

                          Comment

                          • Mastika
                            Member
                            • Feb 2010
                            • 503

                            #14
                            Originally posted by Epirot View Post
                            Anyway, not all of his statements should be taken seriously since he saw things from Bulgarian angle.
                            Of course, we should all be aware of bias. By labelling Macedonians as Bulgarians, Kanchov is presenting bias, however this does not mean that the statistics cannot be used effectively.


                            Originally posted by Epirot View Post
                            There are some traces of an Albanian immigration toward Bulgaria as many indications proof it:
                            This is true, however this was only a fraction of Albanian emigration to other parts of the Ottoman Empire. For example, the former Albanian villages around Ibrik Tepe, in Thrace, were also formed directly as a result of emigration from Albania.

                            Originally posted by Epirot View Post
                            I am somehow dubious for such occurrence since as far I know for Ali Pasha's period there is no expulsion of Macedonians. It is true that there were some conflicts between some Vlachs pastoral communities and Ali Pasha's government but this was true as well as for Albanians since Ali Pasha's cruelty had no boundary. He behaved bad even to his Albanian followers. There are many cases when Albanian villages were forced to move on in order to safe from Ali's repercussions.
                            Macedonia, Ethnography and Statistics ,page 84.

                            "Неговата власть отъ 1788 до 1820 год. е съдѣйствувала на арнаутското население да се укрѣпи въ Корченско и да захване южния брѣгъ на Охридското Езеро, отъ дѣто останалото българско население или избѣгало, или било избито въ врѣме на междуособицитѣ."

                            Translation: Ali Pasha's rule from 1788 until 1820 strengthened the Albanian population in Korca and allowed it to spread to the southern shores of Lake Ohrid, where the Macedonian population either fled or was killed in the fighting.

                            Originally posted by Epirot View Post
                            Reference please?
                            Albanisation of Macedonian’s villages was extremely Rampant during the 19th century.

                            Macedonia - Ethnography and Statistics, page 90.

                            "Цѣлиятъ Горни Дебъръ е заплашенъ отъ поарнаутчанье. Българо-мухамеданскитѣ села, които допиратъ до арнаутски села, сѫ вече двуезични. Жителитѣ на селата Острени, Търново, Кленье, Летенъ, Джепища, Ѫрбеле, Обоки, Макелари и др. прѣдпочитатъ да се казватъ арнаути и да говорятъ арнаутски. Торбешитѣ отъ с. Рเица, най-южно отъ подримскитѣ потурчени села, говорятъ повечето арнаутски и се броятъ вече като арнаути. Отъ друга страна християнското българско население се изселва много бързо отъ мѣстноститѣ Голо Бърдо, П๒ле и Жупа. Селата Вичища, Голейща и Писанки сѫ били въ началото на XIX. вѣкъ български, прѣди 30 години били наполовинъ български, а сега сѫ заселени отъ арнаути. Арнаутитѣ идатъ отъ сѣверни мѣста."

                            Translation: All Upper Debar is at risk of being Albanised. The Macedonian Muslims living next to the Albanian villages are already bilingual. The inhabitants of Dzepishte, Ostreni, Trnovo, Klenje, Leten, Erbele, Oboki, Makelari and others; prefer to call themselves Albanians and to speak Albanian. The Torbeshi from Village Rajca, the most Southern of the Islamise Drimkol villages, speak more Albanian and count themselves as Albanians. However, the Christian Macedonian population very quickly is emigrating from Golo Brdo, Debarsko Pole and Zhupa. The villages of Vichishta, Goleishta and Pisanki, were, at the beginning of the 19th century purely Macedonian, 30 years ago they were only half Macedonian, however, now they are inhabited only by Albanians. The Albanians have come from the North" Note: the village of Erbele is only about 6km's from Peshkopi.

                            Page 89.
                            “Докторъ Мюлеръ, който е пѫтувалъ по тия мѣста прѣзъ 1837—38 год., свидѣтелствува, че село Фердово (Фъргово) имало смѣсено население отъ арнаути и славѣни, и село Калище било чисто славѣнско. [4] Сега Фъргово е чисто арнаутско село, а въ Калище има само 1 останала българска кѫща.”

                            Translation: Doctor Muller, who visited Macedonia in 1837-38, witnessed that Frangovo had a mixed Macedonian/Albanian population, whilst Kalishta was purely Macedonian. Now, Frangovo Is completely Albanian, whilst in Kalishta only one household of Macedonians remain.

                            Page 93.
                            “Отъ половината на XIX. столѣтие много бързо изчезва българското население изъ Гостиварската Нахия и се замѣстя съ арнаути, или пъкъ селата запустяватъ.”

                            Translation: During the second half of the 19th century the Macedonian population in the Gostivar nahiya began to leave en masse, Albanians settled in the former Macedonian villages or the village went empty.

                            Originally posted by Epirot View Post
                            Albanian colonisation as an expression is it hard to sustain since no literary record speaks of any influx en masse of Albanians into Macedonia. If modern Albanians represent some remnants of ancient Illyrians (Ghegs) and Epirots (Tosks) there is no room for inventing an Albanian "colonisation" of Macedonia.
                            It is well-attested Illyrian presence in most of western territories in Macedonia. The only "colonisation" that can be taken seriously is moving of some Albanians in some North-Western districts of today's Bulgaria.
                            I have already mentioned the Albanian colonisation of Eastern Thrace, but let's see what else Kanchov has to say on the matter. There was mass Albanian colonisation of many parts of todays Macedonia.

                            Page 86.
                            "Въ Костуръ има около 50 кѫщи християни арнаути, прѣселени прѣзъ XIX. в. откъмъ Епиръ."

                            Translation: In Kostur there are 50 Christian Albanian houses, Epirotes who arrived in the 19th century.

                            Page 88.

                            "Послѣднитѣ двѣ села сѫ прѣселени изъ Епиръ изъ голѣмото село Пилкадесъ въ Коницка Каза. Около 1840 год. сѫ дошли тукъ бѣлъ-каменци, а около 1860 год. негованци."

                            Translation: The Last two villages (Bel Kamen and Negovan, Lerin region) are populated by emigrants from the Epir, from the big villages of Plikades in the Konica kaza. Those in Bel Kamen arrived in the 1840s whilst those in Negovan arrived in 1860.

                            page 91.

                            "Още по-силенъ е напрѣдъкътъ на арнаутитѣ въ П๓ле... Село Граждани е било до скоро българско. Арнаути дошли малко прѣди 50 год. и сега тѣ сѫ болшинство."

                            Translation: The Albanians have been even more successful on the Debar Pole. Until recently, Grazdani was Macedonian. The Albanians arrived 50 years ago, and now they are the majority there.

                            Page 93.

                            “Особно се усилила арнаутската колонизация въ Пологъ къмъ края на XVIII. в., когато въ Тетово владѣли самовластни паши отъ арнаутско потекло, които нарочно докарвали арнаути изъ Албания…. Сѫщото е и съ Флорино и Чаиле. Арнаутитѣ въ с. Корито сѫ доведени на мѣстото на напустено българско селище въ началото на XIX. в. отъ тетовскитѣ паши изъ близосѣдната Рѣка.”

                            Translation: The Albanian colonisation of the Polog valley began to exacerbate at the end of the 18th century. During this time in Tetovo the local pasha’s, who were of Albanian origin, brought in workers from Albania to work the fields… The same with the villages of Florina and Chajle, as Alabanians from Korito village were brought in to settle the newly vacated Macedonian villages around the turn of the 19th century, on the request of the pasha’s in Tetovo.

                            Page 94.

                            “Арнаутитѣ въ с. Яголъ сѫ прѣселени отъ албалско село Блаце около 1830 год…. Въ с. Поповяни арнаути сѫ дошли около 1840 год. изъ Дебъръ”

                            Translation: The Albanians in the village Jagol resettled in 1830 from the Albanian village of Blace…. In Popovjani the Albanians arrived around 1840 from Debar.

                            Page 87.

                            “П๓ на сѣверъ арнаутски колонии има въ Долна Прѣспа. Тѣ сѫ дошли тукъ изъ Корченско въ по-ново врѣме и държатъ западния брѣгъ на двѣтѣ прѣспански езера. Споредъ събиранитѣ свѣдѣния отъ Пукевила въ началото на XIX. в. Прѣспа е била населена само съ българи.”

                            Translation: To the north there are Albanian colonies in lower prespa. They are recent arrivals from the Korca kaza and they occupy the Western shore on both the large and small Prespa lakes. According to F. Pouqueville at the beginning of the 19th century, prespa was populated by only Macedonians.

                            As You can see there is strong evidence showing the graudal Colonisation of Macedonia by Albanians, coupled with the Albanisation of Macedonian people. Do you deny that either one/both happened?

                            Btw. I have only used the word "българско" because the quotes are directly from Kanchov, for no other reasons. I will not respond if i am attacked on this issue.
                            Last edited by Mastika; 08-03-2010, 11:00 PM.

                            Comment

                            • Soldier of Macedon
                              Senior Member
                              • Sep 2008
                              • 13675

                              #15
                              Originally posted by Epirot
                              This cannot be sustain since earlier Byzantine accounts makes known that Albanians lived in Ohrid and some regions in upper Haliacmon.
                              Epirot, which 'Byzantine' accounts make reference to Albanians living in Ohrid?
                              In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.

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