Macedonian Truth Forum   

Go Back   Macedonian Truth Forum > Macedonian Truth Forum > News and Politics

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-13-2020, 11:48 AM   #521
Soldier of Macedon
Senior Member
 
Soldier of Macedon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Macedonian Outpost
Posts: 13,395
Soldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond repute
Default

https://europeanwesternbalkans.com/2...ian-relations/
Quote:
14.05.2020

Historically, Bulgaria’s policy on the Macedonian question has been characterized by abrupt changes that can be confusing. As after September 1944 when following its inclusion into the Soviet sphere of influence, Bulgaria aligned itself totally with Yugoslav policy on the Macedonian question, even recognizing ethnic Macedonians in its territory, only to reconsider its positions after the Tito-Stalin rift of 1948. Following the declaration of independence of the Republic of Macedonia in September 1991, political elites in Sofia have also been struggling to formulate a coherent policy vis-à-vis Skopje. The decision to recognize the Republic of Macedonia in January 1992 (as Fillip Dimitrov characteristically declared that Bulgaria had a “historic responsibility” to be the first country recognizing it), was supplemented with the clarification, added later, that Bulgaria does not recognize the Macedonian nation and language. In other words, the undisputed diplomatic support provided to the newly independent state at a critical moment (when its constitutional name was disputed by Greece) was compromised by Sofia itself, as it chose to challenge core elements of Macedonian identity. And if you add to that the hard, post-1990, economic transition that Bulgaria went through, when few if any investments took place in the infrastructure connecting the two states, it was only to be expected that the development of bilateral relations would be slow and difficult (the so-called “language dispute” was technically addressed just in 1999) and far bellow Bulgarian expectations. Even worse, from Bulgaria’s point of view, the mediocre progress in bilateral relations was the fault of the “ungrateful Macedonians who were continuing with their anti-Bulgarian policies, in issues such as official historiography or the treatment of those declaring themselves ethnic Bulgarians”. Bulgaria’s post-2000 economic development and its access to NATO and the EU strengthened the country’s diplomatic position and image, including in North Macedonia. All those citizens of the Republic of North Macedonia who chose Bulgarian passports in order to live in Bulgaria (or even as a means to go elsewhere in the EU) underline that. At the same time, it gave Sofia a unique opportunity to approach Skopje, and offer its good services for North Macedonia’s Euroatlantic Integration. As long as the populist Nikola Gruevski and VMRO-DPMNE was in power, such a rapprochement was not possible, due to the way Gruevski was misusing identity politics in order to stay in power. The electoral victory of Zoran Zaev and SDSM and the formation of a new, reformist, pro-European government in Skopje in May 2017 provided a unique opportunity for such a rapprochement to take place. In August 2017, the two sides signed a Treaty of Friendship, Good-Neighborhood and cooperation on the basis of Bulgarian positions on what such a text should include. Thus the Treaty provided for the establishment of an experts commission to examine ‘educational and historical issues’ to be based on ‘authentic and proven historical sources’ and for the celebration of ‘common historical events and personalities’. The commission produced results (achieving for example agreement on Tsar Samuel), however, much to the chagrin of Bulgarian historians, it proved much more difficult to agree on the identity of Gotse Delchev; a difficulty only to be expected given the fact the Delchev is not simply any historical figure in North Macedonia’s historiography, but touches the heart of the Macedonian national narrative. Even worse, the decision to suspend the work of the commission by Skopje was seen by the Bulgarian VMRO as “insulting” and a “proof of the lack of good faith” on the part of Skopje. In the process, VMRO not only demanded a toughening of Sofia’s policies vis-à-vis Skopje but it managed to impose its line on the Bulgarian government. In the Resolution adopted in October 2019, it is made clear, in no uncertain terms, that Sofia “will not allow the integration of the EU to be accompanied by the European legitimization of a state-sponsored ideology on an anti-Bulgarian basis”. The adoption of the document, that was also approved by Parliament, constitutes undoubtedly a turning point in Bulgarian policy: Sofia has “bound itself” into a tough diplomatic position, reminiscent of the Greek policy vis-à-vis North Macedonia, where dominant perceptions of history-identity and a feeling of diplomatic superiority produced a diplomatic position that no Greek government dared to abandon. It remains however to be seen whether Sofia’s new found diplomatic resoluteness will be successful. For certain, Sofia’s diplomatic stance and the whole chorus of voices challenging the identity and language of Macedonians has accentuated the insecurity of many in North Macedonia, playing into domestic politics, at the expense of the reformist forces. Thus, in an emotional statement, President Pendarovski declared that “we don’t need the EU if the price we have to pay is to state that we are not Macedonians or that the language we speak is not Macedonian”; While VMRO-DPMNE is accusing any rational voice in the country that advocates a constructive approach towards Bulgaria, more or less, as a “traitor”. Unfortunately, the stage has been set for a deterioration in relations between Bulgaria and North Macedonia. And while Skopje will probably try to avoid a break-down of relations with Sofia and agree to the reconvening of the experts’ commission, given its vulnerable diplomatic position, it’s doubtful whether the commission can reach consensus on every figure and event under examination. Bulgarian decision-makers should reconsider the merits of the strategy that makes bilateral relations dependent upon the work of a commission of historians. Such a strategy is risky, is producing tension in relations between Bulgaria and North Macedonia, threatening to undermine their future as well as North Macedonia’s European prospects, at the expense of regional stability and prosperity. Does really Sofia want that?
This article is from back in May. Whatever happened to this stupid and humiliating commission? Here is a recent debate between Mickoski and Zaev.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb3PYh17kpU

About an hour and twenty minutes in, the moderator asks them about this issue. Mickoski said he will never change his perception about Delcev and other revolutionaries as Macedonians. He says he will work against the mistakes Zaev made in his capitulations, but stops short of specifically saying he will work towards reversing the agreements with Greece and Bulgaria. For his part, Zaev said that with the commission there was a chance to save Cyril, Methodius, Clement, Naum and Samuel, that we didn’t lose anything, not the Macedonian people or the Macedonian language, and in that same way we will confirm Goce Delcev as a Macedonian. The maggot even had the nerve to quote Delcev. He later goes on to suggest that his friend Borisov publicly acknowledges the Macedonian people and language. But what does any of that mean? What exactly have they agreed upon thus far?
__________________
In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.
Soldier of Macedon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2020, 09:18 PM   #522
Carlin
Senior Member
 
Carlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,766
Carlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud of
Default

BULGARIA & MACEDONIA

The Age-Old Struggle for Narrative

EDWARD P. JOSEPH & OGNEN VANGELOV

In a complex, crowded world, each nation needs a way of expressing its identity that does not antagonize another. An ongoing crisis in the Balkans contains broader lessons.

URL:
https://www.the-american-interest.co...for-narrative/

As global order teeters in the face of pandemic, a stubborn conflict in the Western Balkans is showing that even serious calamity is not forcing hostile governments to bury grievances and work toward positive-sum solutions. As both Bulgaria and North Macedonia extend COVID-19 states of emergency amid lingering pandemics, the former has mounted another challenge to Macedonian identity—an academic squabble that has very real consequences.

The fight is anything but esoteric, with the dispute now part of mainstream political discourse in both countries. As was the case with the decades’ long struggle between Greece and the then-named Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), politicians in Bulgaria and North Macedonia either actively exploit these issues for short-term advantage or feel pressured to defend national honor with over-heated rhetoric. Bulgarian Foreign Minister Ekaterina Zaharieva—effectively the country’s chief diplomat—recently declared that, “the nation that they [Macedonians] have been creating from 1944 must not be based on lies and anti-Bulgarian propaganda.” A potential Bulgarian veto looms over the EC’s decision this month on whether to open North Macedonia’s long-postponed EU accession talks.

The Bulgarian-Macedonian dispute is poorly understood by anyone beyond area specialists. The contours of the dispute, however, are relatively straightforward. Bulgaria’s grievance is grounded in its losses after the first and second Balkan Wars from 1912 to 1913. In the initial war, Bulgaria, together with Serbia, Greece, and Montenegro, drove the Ottomans out. As a result, Macedonia was partitioned, but Serbia and Greece—not Bulgaria—got 90 percent of the territory. Bulgaria was furious because 25 years earlier, it had been awarded most of geographical Macedonia at the end of the Russo-Turkish war. But the 1878 San Stefano Treaty was quickly revised by the Great Powers at the Berlin Congress the same year. This betrayal—the sudden return of Macedonia to the Ottomans—planted the seeds of Bulgarian revanchism. In the second Balkan War, Bulgaria waged war on Serbia and Greece to reclaim more land, but lost, ending up with only a small chunk. To this day, Bulgaria has treated its loss of Macedonia as a national tragedy and injustice.

Following World War II, the Serbian-controlled portion of Macedonia became one of the six constitutive Yugoslav republics. From the moment of the country’s founding, Belgrade feared subversion from its neighbor. Bulgaria was part of the Warsaw Pact and closely aligned with Stalin and his Soviet successors. Tito moved swiftly to bolster Yugoslav Macedonia, recognizing Macedonians as a distinct and constituent “Yugoslav people” and recognizing Macedonian as an official language. In a first for a communist country, Macedonia’s Orthodox Church later became autocephalous.

In the Bulgarian telling, the separate Macedonian identity is simply Tito’s contrivance. Sofia claims that the language is just a western-Bulgarian dialect. Bulgaria insists on the superiority of its tongue, based on its premise that the Bulgarian language was in continuous use since the age of Saints Cyril and Methodius. The two brothers standardized the spoken Slavic in the 9th century and translated the religious scriptures into Slavic for their mission of evangelizing the Slavs. Cyril and Methodius were ethnic Bulgarian—so say today’s Bulgarians—and the language they standardized should be called “Old-Bulgarian.”

The Bulgarian narrative portrays Cyril and Methodius’ disciples as Bulgarian, and the history that followed from the 9th century until modern times as exclusively Bulgarian. Based on this premise, present-day Macedonians are in fact Bulgarians—or at least had been until 1944, when Tito’s People’s Republic of Macedonia was formed. For its part, Macedonian historiography rejects this narrative and calls Cyril and Methodius’s language “Old-Slavic.” The two saints are known as the “Macedonian brothers Cyril and Methodius,” based on their origin from Salonica (present-day Thessaloniki in Greek Macedonia). Macedonians consider their language related to both Bulgarian as well as Serbian, and chart its development independently from the South Slavic dialects spoken in historical Macedonia.

With historians on the two sides stuck, Bulgaria has now issued several demands as Brussels considers opening North Macedonia’s EU membership application. Sofia insists on absolute use of the name Republic of North Macedonia, scrapping the short form North Macedonia, which allegedly implicates territory of present-day Bulgaria. Instead of calling the language Macedonian as the Greeks have done, Sofia insists on a demeaning reference: “the official language of the Republic of North Macedonia.” Further, Sofia would forbid the EU from in any way recognizing the existence of a separate “so-called ‘Macedonian language’.” The Bulgarian Statement includes a demand that all history of the two countries up to 1944 be regarded as “common history”—that is, a single history of a Bulgarian nation until a Macedonian nation “was invented in 1944 by Yugoslav leader Josip Broz-Tito.” North Macedonia rejects this position, as it traces the development of its distinct ethnic and linguistic identity back to the Balkan “national renaissances” of the 19th century and early 20th century.

The way forward is not to attempt immediate resolution of these arcane disputes—an impossibility, particularly given Bulgaria’s advantageous position—but to manage them. Germany and France, backed by the United States and the UK, need to step in where the EU can’t. Paris has a particular obligation here given that it last fall vetoed the long-awaited opening of North Macedonia’s EU negotiations. President Macron’s insistence that the accession process be reformed paved the way for the collapse of the government in North Macedonia. Due to COVID-19, new elections have been postponed, leaving an unruly caretaker coalition in place just as Bulgaria imposes heavy new demands on the small country. Instead of asking the weaker party to concede (as the French Ambassador to North Macedonia recently suggested) Paris needs to work with Berlin on a pathway to compromise. What is needed is a dignified and productive process, undergirded by three shared principles:

First, there are only losers to national disputes over national identities. Greece and North Macedonia are perfect examples. For decades, Greece “prevailed” in its name dispute over its weaker neighbor by insisting it officially use the ridiculous “FYROM” designation in international bodies. And yet Athens’ victory was, to use a term from ancient Greek history, Pyrrhic. Greece’s position was almost universally derided; its diplomats were mocked as sympathy went to the Macedonians; its posture contributed to the image of Greece as a problematic, Balkan country when the financial crisis hit. Its overbearing policy damaged the value of the substantial Greek investment in its poorer, northern neighbor and increased internal and regional instability—all denting Greece’s ambitions to be the responsible leader of the transitioning Balkan region.

Meanwhile, Greek hostility only intensified Macedonian attachment to Alexandrian heritage. In the end, decades of pressure made it harder when two sensible and courageous leaders—Greece’s Alexis Tsipras and North Macedonia’s Zoran Zaev—finally came forward to make the inevitable compromise. Despite Bulgaria’s power advantages, Sofia will never—absent military conquest and decades of subjugation—convince Macedonians that they are not who they think they are, nor that their historical heroes are not Macedonian, nor that their national origin story is different from what they believe it to be. And even brutal occupation has, at best, had middling success at eradicating national narratives.

Second, national identity never rests on historically-provable facts. As the scholar Benedict Anderson put it, national identity is instead a product of “imagined communities,” and imagination, by definition, is ethereal, not tangible. It is grounded in shared interpretations of past events captured in story, song, totem, creed—a narrative creating a feeling in an individual of belonging to a nation. The stories, songs or totems supersede historical proofs; their mere retelling and acceptance is what gives them vibrancy.

The problem in the Balkans is that these identity narratives are deemed mutually exclusive. The mere assertion of a national narrative in one country is seen not just as an affront, but a negation of the other country’s national narrative. Though trivial to outsiders, the offense to national feeling and national pride is palpable—almost existential. Irresponsible politicians seize on the issue for domestic gain, creating an expectation that subsequent leaders are burdened to meet. This is precisely why outsiders are needed, to help politicians find the courage needed to manage what is a mostly unresolvable issue.

In the current case, Bulgaria’s governing coalition consists of right-wing parties, among which is the Defense Minister Krasimir Karakachanov‘s VMRO far-right party. This party is the most vocal advocate for hardline policies toward North Macedonia. Ironically, Macedonia’s opposition party, VMRO-DPMNE, bears the same prefix as the Bulgarian VMRO. This is part of the clashing historical narratives in the two countries. VMRO stands for the “Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization,” which Macedonians consider their own organization that was created at the end of the 19th century to end Ottoman rule in Macedonia. Bulgarians consider it an organization of Bulgarians in the Macedonia of the time that fought for Bulgaria’s interests in Macedonia.

Bulgaria believes that the mere mention of a Macedonian identity prior to 1944 is a negation of the Bulgarian history of Macedonia, which in turn negates the Bulgarian identity itself on the territory of Macedonia. Over 20 years ago, the then-Bulgarian President Peter Stoyanov exclaimed at the Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly: “Macedonia is the most romantic part of Bulgarian history!” This phrase continues to be echoed today by Bulgarian officials who consider it a provocation and hostile, anti-Bulgarian propaganda if Macedonians refer to their history prior to 1944 as Macedonian.

Third, the essential step in this case, or any identity dispute, is for each side to acknowledge the sensitivities of the other and to express willingness to avoid infringing or negating the other’s identity. This “sweet spot” is attained through concrete gestures and, more importantly, a recommitment to the process of ironing out differences in historical interpretation through rigorous, fair, joint scholarship and exchange. The historical commission of the two countries could be supplemented by dispassionate international experts—for example from the London School of Economics, an institute famed for its expertise in this area. The commission could identify areas of agreement as well as dispute, discussing ways to avoid infringing upon identity claims, while continuing to refine a mutual understanding of history.

Compromise is possible. For example, the two countries might agree that their Slavic heritage is of equal significance and that they’re both heirs to it, as some Bulgarian intellectuals suggest. Simply avoiding any “national designation” of cultural heritage prior to 19th century would be another good compromise.

But more important than any specific proposal is the urgent creation of a visible, credible internationally-backed process. To avoid a devastating Bulgarian veto, which would produce crippling tensions between the two countries (and more intrigue from foreign powers with ulterior motives), Sofia and Skopje must be actively engaged on their identity issues. The investment is worth it. Identity disputes still dog much of Europe, threatening the cohesion of several countries. Without a true pan-EU identity, the Union still needs to devise ways for its members to express their national identities and narratives that are not mutually antagonizing. Bulgaria and North Macedonia, with some outside assistance, can create a European model for the free, responsible, and non-provocative expression of national identity.

Published on: June 18, 2020

Edward P. Joseph teaches in Conflict Management at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He served for a dozen years on the ground in the Balkans, in conflict-affected countries including North Macedonia. Ognen Vangelov is a Ph.D at the Centre for the Study of Democracy and Diversity at Queen's University.
Carlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2020, 05:48 AM   #523
Soldier of Macedon
Senior Member
 
Soldier of Macedon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Macedonian Outpost
Posts: 13,395
Soldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond repute
Default

There is so much in that article one could criticise.
Quote:
A potential Bulgarian veto looms over the EC’s decision this month on whether to open North Macedonia’s long-postponed EU accession talks.
VETO. One can only hope.
Quote:
Bulgaria was furious because 25 years earlier, it had been awarded most of geographical Macedonia at the end of the Russo-Turkish war. But the 1878 San Stefano Treaty was quickly revised by the Great Powers at the Berlin Congress the same year.
Sloppy history. Bulgaria wasn't awarded Macedonia. They were 'liberated' at the same time (Macedonia for the briefest of moments), largely due to Russia.
Quote:
In a first for a communist country, Macedonia’s Orthodox Church later became autocephalous.
Interesting observation. Was it a first when the Turkish Muslim Sultan, Abdulaziz, did the same for the Bulgarian Christian Exarchate?
Quote:
Instead of calling the language Macedonian as the Greeks have done, Sofia insists on a demeaning reference: “the official language of the Republic of North Macedonia.”
Does anybody have any examples of Greeks or Greek officials referring to the language of their neighbours as Macedonian since the treacherous Prespa Agreement?
Quote:
Over 20 years ago, the then-Bulgarian President Peter Stoyanov exclaimed at the Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly: “Macedonia is the most romantic part of Bulgarian history!”
And they accuse Macedonians of stealing their history. The hypocrisy of these morons.
Quote:
The historical commission of the two countries could be supplemented by dispassionate international experts—for example from the London School of Economics, an institute famed for its expertise in this area.
More outsiders telling Macedonians who they are. Great idea. Why isn't the history of the modern Bulgarians also scrutinised in the same way? I am sure there are some Tatar and Chuvash peoples in Russia (the likely descendants of the original Turkic Bulgars) who would have an opinion on these Slavic-speaking peasants of Moesia and Thrace claiming to be true descendants of the Bulgars.
Quote:
To avoid a devastating Bulgarian veto, which would produce crippling tensions between the two countries (and more intrigue from foreign powers with ulterior motives), Sofia and Skopje must be actively engaged on their identity issues.
Hint: The Russians are coming, lol.

The very fact that Zaev and these supposed historians from Macedonia would engage in such a humiliating process is disgraceful. Of particular stupidity is this "red line" some have spoken about, as if the other Macedonians of that era can be up for debate so long as we don't negotiate on Goce Delcev. These people and/or their ancestors were from Macedonia, practiced Macedonian culture and spoke Macedonian dialects as their native language. Despite their action against the Greeks in the 19th century under the common socio-religious term of "Bulgarian", if the Macedonians felt exactly the same as Bulgarians there never would've been Macedonian individualism ("separatism") in terms of identity, language, church, political interests, etc. Where are all of the corresponding examples of other Balkan peoples who also went by the same socio-religious term? They don't exist. Also, despite the delusions and misconceptions of some (back then and now), the Bulgarian "identity" in Macedonia never represented an authentic ancestral heritage, which is evidenced by the fact that when Macedonian literary figures began to write about the history of their people and homeland, the majority of them made reference to figures from Macedonia in the context of historical predecessors. Most Macedonians during that period couldn't name any of those horse-riding Turkic invaders. They were, quite simply, a negligible or non-existent spec in our collective memory as a people.

Personally, I am pleased with the way the Bulgarians are behaving, because it proves that Macedonians were right to be suspicious of their intentions all along. Any sane Macedonian could see this long ago if they took an honest approach towards our history. Ljupco Georgievski, Petar Kolev, Petar Bogojeski and other bulgarophile maggots in Macedonia always avoid criticising the despicable behaviour of Bulgarian chauvinists and instead blame their own people for the tensions between the two countries or change the subject, usually towards the lack of criticism about Serbia. Whatever. I make no excuses for the anti-Macedonian positions taken by Serbia, both past and present. Their attitude towards the Macedonian Orthodox Church is also repugnant, especially given the fact that their Patriarchate of Pec was once under the jurisdiction of the Archbishopric of Ohrid in Macedonia. They are just as much to blame for past horrors in Macedonia. However, the church issue aside, Serbia is not the country that is trying to erase our ethno-linguistic identity in an official capacity through bilateral agreements. Perhaps if they were more empowered they would've behaved differently, but that is not the case today. That (dis)honour belongs to Greece and Bulgaria, so the aforementioned bulgarophiles have nowhere to slither now. Krste Misirkov had the foresight to call it 117 years ago and we have come full circle again:
Quote:
Oh, Macedonians! It is time we realized that the greatest demon Macedonia must battle against is none other than Bulgaria; and this is why we must keep our interests apart from those of Bulgaria. Common sense demands it.......
After everything our people have fought for, our ancestors must be turning in their graves.
__________________
In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.
Soldier of Macedon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2020, 12:08 PM   #524
Soldier of Macedon
Senior Member
 
Soldier of Macedon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Macedonian Outpost
Posts: 13,395
Soldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond repute
Default

These clips (all similar) are from late last year but worth noting on this thread. Mickoski is a disgraceful opportunist, letting that fat Bulgar demean Macedonia to his face, yet afterwards, he makes some pathetic speech for the cameras about not giving up the Macedonian language and Goce Delcev.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ywKzcroelY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Llp272n3EM4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_-2C5Xei14
__________________
In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.
Soldier of Macedon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2020, 09:34 PM   #525
Carlin
Senior Member
 
Carlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,766
Carlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud of
Default

Северна Македонија и бугарскиот историски империјализам

Наводните научни докази за бугарскиот карактер на македонскиот јазик е кармакаша на селективно одбрани потврди во која странски крунски сведоци ја застапуваат бугарската гледна точка, смета историчарот Улф Брунбауер

URL:
https://www.dw.com/mk/%D1%81%D0%B5%D...%BC/a-54265248

На 7 мај 2020 Бугарската академија на науките (БАН) во нејзините простории во Софија ја презентираше брошурата „За службениот јазик на Република Северна Македонија” која главно беше поддржана од Институтот за бугарски јазик при Академијата.
Најавата за претставувањето на книгата ја сумира поентата на содржината и на потенцијалните читател/ки им олеснува да не се мачат со читање на делото: “Во книгата се покажува дека службениот јазик на Република Северна Македонија е југозападна писмено-регионална форма на бугарскиот јазик”.
Па така се чини дека книгата целосно ја исполнува намерата на членовите и соработниците на БАН - имено тие ја предложија формулацијата за „единствена позиција” на бугарската наука за прашањето за „службениот јазик” на малата соседна земја на југозапад.

„Вистината” за македонскиот јазик

Аргументацијата во брошурата зошто кај „таканаречениот ‘македонски јазик’” всушност се работи за „политички променетa” варијанта на бугарскиот јазик е исто толку неоригинална колку и предвидлива.
Почнувајќи со јазични документи од 9 век и делото на „словенските апостоли” Кирил и Методиј, како и на нивните ученици - кои се разбира не создале азбука за црковниот старословенски, туку за старобугарскиот јазик - преку топоними и ономастија, изјавите на раните европски слависти кои словенскиот јазик што се зборува на територијата на Македонија го означуваат како бугарски, па сѐ до сопственото декларирање како Бугари на автори кои потекнуваат од Македонија од „периодот на повторното будење” - се наоѓаат вообичаените бугарски аргументи во сега веќе 70-годишниот бугарско-македонски конфликт за историјата, јазикот и културата на Македонија.

- повеќе на темата: За среќата и национализмот

Нешто ново не се смисли ни во проектот на БАН предводен од потпретседателот на Академијата, Васил Николов.
Човек се прашува кого тогаш авторите сакаат да убедат во „вистината” (поим кој се појавува во насловот на четири поглавја), особено што е официјална позиција на Република Бугарија дека македонски не е самостоен јазик. Наводните научни докази за бугарскиот карактер на македонскиот јазик е кармакаша на селективно одбрани потврди во која секогаш имаат збор по можност странски крунски сведоци кои ја застапуваат бугарската гледна точка (не изненадува дека на пример меѓународно најпознатиот експерт за македонскиот јазик, Виктор Фридман, кој истовремено е и страствен борец за неговиот статус како самостоен јазик, не може да се најде во содржината). Констатацијата дека национално-македонски истражувачи на јазикот и историчари манипулирале извори од 19 век со тоа што прилично широкоградо заменувале „бугарски” со „македонски” или едноставно сокривале дека и неутрални набљудувачи во тоа време словенскиот идиом го означувале како „бугарски” и дека звучни имиња на револуционери од Македонија се чувствувале како Бугари, е точна, но веќе и досадна; само ограничени македонски националисти денес зад таквите културолошки или политички изјави на Словените во 19 век гледаат артикулирање на македонската национална свест, а нив ни книвчето нема да ги убеди во нешто друго.

Исцепканото „наведување докази” на авторите не се здобива со кредибилитет ни преку сопственото слепило за нијанси или различни мислења - па така уште пред 1944 имало гласови кои на идиомот што се зборува во Македонија му припишувале самостоен карактер и се залагале за создавање сопствени стандарди. Авторите на „периодот на повторното будење” кои бугарската литературна историја си ги присвојува, делумно пишувале на различни јазици, меѓу другото и локални дијалекти на кои подоцна е заснован македонскиот литературен јазик.
Дека има нешто како јужнословенски континуитет на дијалекти, дека заедницата на лица кои зборуваат еден идиом не засноваат „етникум”, дека дотичниот службен јазик почива на политички чин, дека може да настанат нови стандарди - а, Македонците во тоа биле зад Бугарите - дека јазичната политика наменски интервенира во развојот на јазикот, сето тоа се чини дека им е непознато на бугарските истражувачи од Бугарската академија на науките.
Водат борба на 19 век со аргументи од 19 век. Такви карти на дијалекти ја заокружуваат големо-бугарската ориентација на книгичката - траумата од Сан Стефано се чини барем во ходниците на БАН уште многу вирулентна.
Тоа што авторите покажуваат и големо непознавање на културниот и историски развој на, во 1944 во рамки на Југославија, прогласената Република Македонија, е повторно типично за Бугарија: повеќето Бугари имаат силно втемелено мислење за Македонија, но земјата ретко кој ја знае – државната телевизија дури и нема свој дописник во Скопје.

- повеќе на темата: Бугарија не беше фашистичка држава, но беше окупатор

Чуму тогаш ваква неофицијална иницијатива за откривање на вистината за „таканаречениот ‘македонски јазик’” кој го зборуваат „таканаречените ‘етнички Македонци”? И зошто се вадат во овој момент кога аргументите од Софија и контрааргументите од Скопје со децении повеќе од изџвакани завршуваа во бесцелни дебати и не покажуваа ништо друго освен континуитет на национализам дури и меѓу оние кои се прокламираат за научна елита на својата земја? Последната страница во книвчето ја навестува мотивацијата за него: „Основата за официјалните норми на македонскиот јазик и начинот на кој е кодифициран и вештачки поставен од горе до доле, му дава статус на варијанта, но не и на самостоен јазик.” Quod erat demonstrandum.
Авторите дарежливо им признаваат на Македонците, дека таквата норма сепак може да ја исполнува функцијата на државен јазик (но, да не се нарекува „македонски јазик”).
Но, колективот на автори пледира за тоа да се надминеле рефлексите од минатото – „младата држава” Северна Македонија имала перспективи без да мора да се „потпре на било каква измислена приказна”.
Наместо тоа требало да се бара „при научни контакти на двете земји, да се опстојува строго на објективната научна вистина без политизирање и потчинување на стари идеолошки клишеа” - на кого се однесува барањето не мора експлицитно да се каже. Да не се работеше за публикација на веќе познатата нехумористична БАН, би можеле да помислиме дека авторите имаат дарба за иронија.
Книвчето значи не е ништо освен псеудо-научен обид да се потврди официјалната позиција на бугарската влада спрема историјата и јазикот на Северна Македонија. Како што е познато сѐ се врти околу бугарската опсесија со помалку или повеќе непроменети позиции од 50-те години. Како што критички бугарски интелектуалци неодамна констатираа, се чини дека барем на владино ниво во Софија националкомунистичките ставови во однос на Македонија и натаму се користат. Но, има конкретен повод зошто тие застарени аргументи денес беа извадени од нафталинот на бугарско-македонските историски контроверзи, и токму тоа ја прави публикацијата на БАН, и покрај нејзината интелектуална сиромаштија, сепак релевантна. Владата на Република Бугарија се обидува да ги искористи претпристапните преговори на Северна Македонија со ЕУ, за да ја натера земјата да го преземе бугарското гледиште на историјата.
За што се работи?

Бугарски список на желби за влез на Северна Македонија во ЕУ

На 26 април 2020 година Советот на министри на ЕУ донесе заклучок за отворање на преговорите за членство со Северна Македонија (и Албанија). Северна Македонија на ова мораше да чека 15 години – во 2005 Европската комисија за прв пат препорача почеток на преговори за членство. Но, со години наназад грчките влади тоа го блокираа со вето, затоа што одбиваа да го прифатат избраното име на земјата, Република Македонија, и се противеа на присвојувањето на наследството на античките Македонци од страна на официјалната македонска политика за историјата.
Односите беа нормализирани со договорот од Преспа во 2018 година прифатен од двете страни – Македонците оттогаш се откажаа од античките Македонци како нивни претци. Договорот од Преспа на меѓународен план беше оценет како храбар чекор на двајца премиери, кои со еден историски компромис успеаја да решат еден тежок и компликуван конфликт иако и во двата случаи требаше да се соочат со масовен отпор на поголемиот дел од населението во своите земји. Во Софија се чини дека научија поинаква лекција: како земја која е веќе членка на ЕУ, има право да искористи вето за да спроведе дури и неверојатни барања против една земја кандидат, особено ако се работи за мала и посиромашна земја. На 9 октомври 2019 година, пред состанокот на Европскиот совет на кој на дневен ред беше прифаќањето на почеток на преговори со Северна Македонија, Бугарија донесе одлука за таканаречена „рамковна позиција“ во однос на проширувањето на ЕУ. Оваа позиција, според порталот Балкан инсајт, содржи долг „список на желби со барања“ за Северна Македонија – сите овие се желби поврзани со прашања од историографија и национален идентитет – накусо кажано, Бугарија ултимативно бара преземање на нејзиното историско гледиште за Македонија.

- повеќе на темата: Дичев: Што точно сакаме од нашите соседи?

Националната македонска интерпретација на историјата, која се развива по етаблирањето на земјата како дел од југословенските републики во 1944 година, во овој владин документ е класифицирана како „антибугарска идеолошка конструкција на југословенскиот тоталитаризам“.
Што бара бугарската влада како услов од Северна Македонија пред ратификација на пристапниот договор? Северна Македонија, според барањето, мора да ги отстрани сите описи на споменици и плочи на кои се гледа „отворена омраза против Бугарите“, како на пример каде што се говори за „бугарска фашистичка окупација". (За потсетување – во текот на уништувањето на Југославија од нацистичка Германија во 1941 година трупите на сојузничка Бугарија окупираа големи делови од Македонија и водеа политика на „етничко чистење“ кон Србите кои живееја на окупираните територии. Со активна помош на бугарските окупатори и Евреите од Вардарска Македонија во 1943 година беа депортирани во концентрационите логори.) Историската комисија која беше основана во 2017 врз база на билатералниот Договор за пријателство и добрососедство мора да дојде до заедничка оцена на „заедничката историја до 1944 година“, меѓу другото и во однос на личноста на Гоце Делчев, Внатрешната револуционерна ослободителна организација ВМРО и Илинденското востание од 1903.
Со оглед на тоа дека документот зборува за „заедничка историја“ јасно е дека не крие ништо повеќе од услов за Северна Македонија, овие настани и личности да ги гледа како „бугарски“, бидејќи од бугарска гледна точка во 1944 година официјално немало политичка единка наречена Македонија или македонски народ, а само такви би можеле да бидат носители на сопствена историја.
Северна Македонија мора да ги усогласи своите учебници по историја, географија и литература како и историските споменици според резултатите од Историската комисија – при што бугарските членови се залагаат за традиционалниот бугарски националистички став. При „усогласување“ на наставата по историја и литература мора да се внимава на тоа изворните текстови од 19 и 20 век репродуцирани во учебниците да бидат „презентирани и предавани според лингвистичкиот стандард на оригиналот во кој се напишани - со други зборови, на бугарски јазик – тоа е намерата на владата. Политичарите и други официјални актери во иднина ќе мора нивните „официјални изјави и коментари“ да ги засноваат на текстовите договорени од заедничката Историска комисија. Толку од бугарското поимање на слобода на мислење и истражување.
Воопшто не изненадува ниту барањето на бугарската влада од Северна Македонија да се воздржи од било каква поддршка на „таканареченото македонско малцинство“ во Бугарија кое не е официјално признаено. За возврат луѓето кои биле жртви на „југословенскиот комунистички режим“ поради нивниот бугарски идентитет треба да бидат рехабилитирани. И во однос на јазикот, бугарската влада во рамковната позиција го формулира барањето кое половина година подоцна го даде Бугарската академија на науки со псевдонаучно објаснување: во сите ЕУ документи кои се однесуваат на пристап на Северна Македонија мора да се користи фразата “официјален јазик на Република Северна Македонија, а онаму каде што во ЕУ документите не може да се избегне употребата на терминот „македонски јазик“ тогаш со фуснота да се забележи: Според уставот на Република Северна Македонија. Се разбира таков документ не би можел да се оцени како признавање од страна на Бугарија за постоењето на „таканаречен македонски јазик различен од бугарскиот”.

Историја и дипломатија во Југоисточна Европа

Како што стојат нештата, балканската дипломатија со „ѕвездички” и натаму е многу популарна: Косово на меѓународната сцена мора да живее со фуснота до своето име, а слична судбина и се заканува и на Северна Македонија. А, сето тоа и покрај фактот дека државата во случај без преседан под притисок на јужниот сосед си го смени официјалното име на државата, со надеж дека некогаш ќе стане членка на ЕУ – опција која во моментов и не е така конкретна. Сега, според бугарската влада, ќе треба да се откаже и од својата историја.
Цитатот кој му е припишан на Черчил дека Балканот продуцира повеќе историја отколку што може да апсорбира, е едно од клишеата со кои често се стигматизира регионот. Сепак не може да се негира дека спротивставените интерпретации на историјата често ги трујат билатералните односи и ја интензивираат внатрешнополитичка поларизација во општеството. Специфичниот правец на формирање нации и држави во постимперијална Југоисточна Европа поврзан со распад и новоосновање на држави сѐ до поновото минато, остави вишок националистички историски слики кои во нивната интелектуална едноставност се контраст на реалните преклопувања на тесно испреплетената историја.
Политички квази-историчари и покорни научници „заедничката историја“ не ја разбираат како нешто што го делиме, само со различна перспектива, туку повеќе како „шлагворт” за да може на другиот да му се наметне сопствената страна на вистината.
Сепак, на Северна Македнија тука „и се удира од глава” тоа што оформувањето на нејзината нација започнало „доцна“ со основањето на републиката како дел од федерална Југославија во 1944 година, која на македонската нација за само неколку години и ги даде сите национални обележја – државни институции, јазик, национална историја, знаме итн.
Меѓутоа многу важни настани, места и личности (особено од 19 и средниот век) кои сега станаа конститутивни носители на националната историја, се веќе дел од историјата на други земји, особено на бугарската.
Ниту бугарската десноконзервативна влада, ни Бугарската академија на науки не се подготвени да ги делат, а уште помалку да ги преиспитаат од аспект на нивниот конструиран карактер.
Порадо се препуштаат на националниот романтизам – кој сега иронично знае како да го инструментализира пост-националниот проект на европската интеграција во своја корист.
Кому тоа треба да му послужи освен на неколкуте гласачи на „патриотите“ застапени во актуелната бугарска владина коалиција, е магловито.
Но, со оглед на ниското ниво на ентузијазам во главните градови на „старите“ ЕУ членки во поглед на можната интеграција на Западниот Балкан во ЕУ, не може да се исклучи дека никој нема да се спротивстави на обидите на Бугарија на својот сосед - во име на взаемното пријателство! – да му го наметне својот многу специфичен поглед за неговата историја.

Улф Брунбауер е австриски историчар и директор на Инстиутот за источни и југоисточни студии на Универзитетот Регензбург, Германија. Анализата е објавена на блогот на Институтот и во оригинал може да се прочита на следниот линк:
https://erinnerung.hypotheses.org/82...48fq2vBxhFCAmI
Carlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2020, 12:21 PM   #526
Soldier of Macedon
Senior Member
 
Soldier of Macedon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Macedonian Outpost
Posts: 13,395
Soldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond repute
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlin15 View Post
Северна Македонија и бугарскиот историски империјализам

Наводните научни докази за бугарскиот карактер на македонскиот јазик е кармакаша на селективно одбрани потврди во која странски крунски сведоци ја застапуваат бугарската гледна точка, смета историчарот Улф Брунбауер
The kraut makes a few decent political observations but the rest is just dribble from another pretentious westerner that possesses only a superficial understanding of Macedonian history. As such, he should reserve his commentary for some other nation that is more deserving of his type of support. Moving on, it is the 3 year anniversary of the agreement with the Bulgars and apparently the "commission" formed to destroy our history and the way our younger generations are taught in Macedonia may be meeting again in September.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Q8Jv6SUcLw

It is pathetic to see the Macedonian scholars sitting across the table from those jackals and negotiating our identity like it's a stack of chips on a poker table. Apparently they've already made an agreement on a number of historical figures, but not sure if that is defined as a concrete outcome yet.

https://bg.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A1...BD%D0%B8%D1%8F

Also disappointing to see people like Vančo Ǵorǵiev there. His heart may be in the right place but in my opinion he and his colleagues are conceding way too much and are naive to think that their participation in this "commission" will somehow force the Bulgars to consider revising their own school books in any meaningful way. This was an interesting debate between Ǵorǵiev and Todor Čepreganov from last year:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vuk1l3yE-p8

Every nation has their own collective memory and national narrative. If all European countries had to go through this process it would precipitate WW3. The whole process is a charade and a testament to how certain European countries look down on Macedonia.
__________________
In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.
Soldier of Macedon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2020, 05:47 PM   #527
Carlin
Senior Member
 
Carlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,766
Carlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud of
Default

“Goce Delcev is a Bulgarian teacher and revolutionary” is the proposal from Sofia that Zaev will have to accept?

URL:
https://english.republika.mk/news/ma...ave-to-accept/

Goce Delcev is a Bulgarian revolutionary and teacher who fought for the liberation of the autonomous Bulgarian region called “Macedonia” from the Ottomans.

This will be one of the proposals of the Bulgarian history commission which will be sent to their Macedonian colleagues at the next meeting, “Republika” has learned from sources in the commissions.

This proposal has long been discussed in Bulgarian political and historical circles as a red line to which Bulgaria can go in the negotiations on Goce Delcev.

Last edited by Carlin; 09-14-2020 at 05:49 PM.
Carlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2020, 07:32 PM   #528
Risto the Great
Senior Member
 
Risto the Great's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Macedonian Colony of Australia
Posts: 15,029
Risto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond repute
Default

The Severedonians will smirk and say, 'sure, he taught Bulgarian, therefore we can accept him as a Bulgarian teacher" .... Because that's how clever they are.
__________________
Risto the Great
MACEDONIA:ANHEDONIA

"Holding my breath for the revolution."
Risto the Great is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2020, 08:22 PM   #529
Carlin
Senior Member
 
Carlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,766
Carlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud ofCarlin has much to be proud of
Default

Што се бара Бугарија во меморандумот до ЕУ?

URL:
https://sitel.com.mk/shto-se-bara-bu...randumot-do-eu

Бугарскиот меморандум во целост објавен - земја кандидат не треба да внесува отворени прашања во ЕУ. Бараат во преговарачката рамка да стои посебно поглавје во кое Скопје ќе гарантира дека ќе прифати се што бара Бугарија. Главната теза е дека не постојат „македонци“ како етничка,туку само како географска припадност. Ова е и предуслов за сите понатамошни чекори во процесот. Официјална Софија бара придавката македонци да не се користи, туку за широка меѓународна употреба да стои фразата „ од Р. Северна Македонија “ .

„Во соседните земји, терминот „македонски“ се користи за означување на географско потекло, наместо на национален идентитет. Во Бугарија, стотици илјади Бугари се идентификуваат како „Македонци“ во однос на нивната регионална припадност, што јасно укажува на бугарското етничко потекло. Од оваа причина, значително недоразбирање се јавува кога изразите „македонски“ и „со потекло од Република Северна Македонија“ стои во документот што во целост го објави бугарската агенција БГНЕС,

Во продолжение стои дека Македонија не го почитува договорот од 2017-та за добрососедство, а македонската комисија прави опструкции во спроведувањето.

Во однос на јазикот, Бугарија инсистира на тоа кога Македонија ќе стане членка на ЕУ во документите да стои „официјалниот јазик на Република Северна Македонија“ или, во случај на апсолутна потреба, на „македонски јазик“ со ѕвездичка и објаснување: „според Уставот на Република Северна Македонија“. Дополнително ова прашање ќе се затвори откако Македонија официјално ќе се изјасни до ООН и сите меѓународни институции дека „употребата на краткото име на државата предвидена во Договорот од Преспа се однесува само на политичкиот субјект „Република Северна Македонија“, а не до географскиот регион Северна Македонија.“

Дополнително Бугарија тврди дека пред 80 години во Македонија биле убиени десетици илјади бугари и над 100 000 затворени.

Бугарија очекува солидарност од сите партнери во ЕУ да ги земат предвид нивните реални проблеми.

Владејачката СДСМ се надева дека се може да се реши по пат на дијалог и спорот со Бугарија нема да биде пречка во евроинтегративниот процес.

Опозицијата бара Собранието да расправа за бугарскиот меморандум. Пратеникот Антонио Милошоски бугарските позиции ги смета за неевропски.
Carlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2020, 06:30 PM   #530
Risto the Great
Senior Member
 
Risto the Great's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Macedonian Colony of Australia
Posts: 15,029
Risto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond reputeRisto the Great has a reputation beyond repute
Default Bulgaria asks EU to stop 'fake' Macedonian identity

https://www.dw.com/en/bulgaria-asks-...ity/a-55020781

Quote:
In another Balkan historical dispute, Sofia has asked its fellow EU members to stop North Macedonia's accession bid. Sofia wants its neighbor to admit to sharing a common history with Bulgaria.

A long-simmering historical dispute between two Balkan neighbors is about to enter the corridors of Brussels again as North Macedonia expects an official start to the EU accession negotiation process in December. An EU candidate country since 2005, North Macedonia hoped that solving the name dispute with Greece would end the historical quarrels with its Balkan neighbors and, after having entered NATO in March, start the country down the long road to full EU membership.

But Bulgaria has different ideas.

Read more: EU's 'no' to Western Balkans could spark conflict

A document titled the "Explanatory Memorandum on the relationship of the Republic of Bulgaria with the Republic of North Macedonia in the context of the EU enlargement and Association and Stabilization Process" caught the attention of the media in North Macedonia last week. The six-page memorandum, sent to 26 EU capitals from Sofia in August, lays out Bulgaria's position on several historical issues. Key among them, as Sofia claims: "the ethnic and linguistic engineering that has taken place" in North Macedonia since World War II.

"The accession path of the Republic of North Macedonia provides a valuable opportunity for its leadership to break with the ideological legacy and practices of communist Yugoslavia," the Bulgarian memorandum stated. "The enlargement process must not legitimize the ethnic and linguistic engineering that has taken place under former authoritarian regimes."

According to the official Bulgarian view of history, people of Slavic descent who live in North Macedonia are Bulgarians who speak the Bulgarian language but were brainwashed during the Josip Broz Tito's communist regime in the former Yugoslavia and were artificially given a new "Macedonian" identity and language in the process.

Pressing nationalistic views

The claim is not new. It is the official position of the Bulgarian state since the 1950s and, as a result, the historical misunderstandings between the two neighbors often boiled over in the political arena. As a member of the European Union, Bulgaria sees an advantage and aims to use it.

Ulf Brunnbauer, chair of history of Southeast and Eastern Europe at the University of Regensburg, said the memorandum is Bulgaria's way of "pressing its own nationalistic view on the history and culture of another country and its people."

"It would be similar to Germany telling the Austrians that they are actually Germans, or Denmark calling the Norwegians an anomaly because they used to be part of their empire and their standard language developed later than Danish," Brunnbauer told DW.

The memorandum caused consternation in North Macedonia and condemnation in parts of the Bulgarian academia as well.

Macedonian Deputy Prime Minister Nikola Dimitrov said, "Language is not subject to recognition or nonrecognition because in the 21st century, especially in Europe, the right to self-determination and self-expression cannot be denied."

Bulgarian sociologist Ivaylo Ditchev wrote for DW that the primary "accusation" made in the Bulgarian memo is the fact that "North Macedonia exists at all."

"And if that new nation persistently refuses to abolish itself — Bulgaria considers that an act of aggression," Ditchev wrote.

Occupation or liberation?

During the Second World War, the Kingdom of Bulgaria was part of the Axis powers and occupied the territory of what is today North Macedonia. Macedonian history considers this period "Bulgarian fascist occupation." But Bulgaria denies that assertion and claims that its forces liberated what it considers its brethren in the west. In a declaration adopted by the parliament last year, Sofia told Skopje to stop using the term "fascist occupation" in reference to Bulgaria in its history books and to remove all such mention on the World War II monuments in the country.

Disagreements like this were supposed to be solved by a commission formed after the signing of a bilateral friendship agreement in 2017.

A group of historians and education experts from both countries started working on the long list of divisive issues but stopped last year. The official reason was because of the elections in North Macedonia and later the coronavirus pandemic, unofficially, there were insurmountable disagreements. Now the Bulgarian government insists that the commission continue its work and show results or North Macedonia's path towards the EU would be stopped before it can begin in earnest.

No place for bilateral issues

While the EU has so far been quiet on the issue, Germany, as the current holder of the rotating European Council presidency, called on both countries to resolve outstanding problems in the history commission. German Ambassador in North Macedonia Anke Holstein rejected Bulgaria's attempt to include the bilateral issues in the EU negotiations framework.

"Bilateral problems should be solved bilaterally," Holstein told Radio Free Europe.

But, according to Dragi Gjorgiev, president of the Macedonian team of experts in the Macedonian-Bulgarian commission, that won't be an easy task.

"The Bulgarian memorandum, which denies the modern Macedonian language and identity, is not helpful for the commission's success," Gjorgiev told DW.

While Ditchev, and other political analysts on both sides of the border think the memorandum might be a PR-stunt of Boyko Borisov's Bulgarian government to turn the attention of the public opinion after months of anti-corruption protests in the country, others disagree.

"Protests in Sofia have nothing to do with this," Andrey Kovatchev member of the European Parliament from Bulgaria's governing conservative GERB party, wrote in an op-ed for DW Macedonian on Saturday. The government in Sofia would not change its position, Kovatchev said, adding that North Macedonia will not be allowed to start the EU accession negotiations unless it accepts Bulgaria's demands.

"Do not hope! You will never find another traitor like Georgi Dimitrov [the first communist leader of Bulgaria 1946-1949, who recognized the existence of a separate Macedonian nation and Macedonian language] in Bulgaria to get this thing done for you.," he said.

German historian Brunnbauer, on the other hand, called on Brussels and "especially Berlin" to put pressure on the Bulgarian government.

"The question of how historians or politicians in (North) Macedonia interpret the history of their nation and of their language might enrage Bulgarian nationalists (and vice versa)," he said. "But it has zero connection with the Copenhagen criteria or any other criteria an accession country needs to fulfill for membership in the EU."
The question of what they call themselves is also of zero connection, but we know how that went.

Severedonians would accept all of this as long as nobody points the finger directly at them for the betrayal. Such a shameful existence.
__________________
Risto the Great
MACEDONIA:ANHEDONIA

"Holding my breath for the revolution."
Risto the Great is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 4 (0 members and 4 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump