Macedonian Truth Forum

Macedonian Truth Forum (http://www.macedoniantruth.org/forum/index.php)
-   Exposing Lies and Propaganda (http://www.macedoniantruth.org/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=6)
-   -   The Real Ethnic Composition of Modern Greece (http://www.macedoniantruth.org/forum/showthread.php?t=17)

tchaiku 04-16-2017 11:17 AM

Slavs retreated Pindos mountains, western Crete, Laconia* in 11th century [I]according [/I]to this book:
[url]https://books.google.com/books?id=mQYXAQAAIAAJ&q=slavs+pindos+mountains+s+retreat&dq=slavs+pindos+mountains+s+retreat&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjL2eWAr6nTAhUBOhQKHby3CooQ6AEIJDAA[/url]
Mysteriously Vlachs appear in those zones times after.


* - Keep in your mind that Slavs according to Byzantine historians ruled Peloponnese for over 200 years, so it puts things on perspective. Also it is fair to mention that non Slavic population start appearing in those zones after ''Hellenization'' of those Slavs.

Carlin 04-16-2017 11:22 AM

[QUOTE=tchaiku;167823]Slavs retreated Pindos mountains, western Crete, Laconia* in 11th century [I]according [/I]to this book:
[url]https://books.google.com/books?id=mQYXAQAAIAAJ&q=slavs+pindos+mountains+s+retreat&dq=slavs+pindos+mountains+s+retreat&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjL2eWAr6nTAhUBOhQKHby3CooQ6AEIJDAA[/url]
Mysteriously Vlachs appear in those zones times after.


* - Keep in your mind that Slavs according to Byzantine historians ruled Peloponnese for over 200 years, so it puts things on perspective. Also it is fair to mention that non Slavic population start appearing in those zones after ''Hellenization'' of those Slavs.[/QUOTE]

Good find. :thumbup:

tchaiku 04-17-2017 08:13 AM

The Vlachs of Thessaly first appear in Byzantine sources in the 11th century, in the Strategikon of Kekaumenos and Anna Komnene's Alexiad. Kekaumenos, who wrote in the late 1070s, in particular stresses both their [B]transhumanism as well as their disdain of imperial authorities[/B].

Kekaumenos records a failed [B]Vlach uprising of 1066, under the unwilling leadership of Nikoulitzas Delphinas[/B], a relative of his and grandson of the original Nikoulitzas, whom Emperor Basil II (r. 976–1025) placed to rule over the Thessalian Vlachs.

Anna Komnene reports a Vlach [U][B]settlement [/B][/U]near[B] Mount Ossa in 1083[/B], in connection with the campaign of her father, Alexios I Komnenos (r. 1081–1118), against the Normans

Carlin 04-17-2017 11:52 PM

From Capital to Colony: Five New Inscriptions from Roman Crete
[url]https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/annual-of-the-british-school-at-athens/article/from-capital-to-colony-five-new-inscriptions-from-roman-crete1/93948C0CC6BD944FC17D0B297EB6BE19[/url]

This article present and contextualises five new inscriptions from central Crete: one from the hinterland of Gortyn, two from Knossos, and two more in all likelihood from Knossos. Internal geographical mobility from Gortyn to Knossos is illustrated by a Greek inscription from the hinterland of Gortyn. The Knossian inscriptions add new evidence for the local affairs of the [B]Roman colony[/B]. A funerary or honorary inscription and two religious dedications – [B]all three in Latin[/B] – give rise to new points concerning the [B]well-attested link between Knossos and Campania[/B]. [B]The colony's population included people, many of Campanian origin[/B], who were already established in Crete, as well as [B]families displaced from southern Italy in the great post-Actium settlement[/B]. The two religious dedications shed light on the city's religious practice, including a newly revealed cult of Castor, and further evidence for worship of the Egyptian gods. Oddest of all, a Greek inscription on a Doric epistyle names Trajan or Hadrian. These four inscriptions are then set into the context of linguistic choice at the colony. Epigraphic and numismatic evidence for the use of Latin and Greek in the life of the colony is analyzed on the basis of the available inscriptions, listed by category and date in an appendix.


Campania
[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campania[/url]

Map showing the "roman coloniae" in the second century, after Trajan
[url]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3f/Romancoloniae.jpg[/url]

Check out the concentration in Greece (including Crete), Macedonia and Albania when compared to other European regions and areas. Moreover, note that [I]modern Romania[/I] is completely empty of "roman coloniae". Also, Sardinia and Corsica seem relatively untouched when compared to either Macedonia or Greece.

Looking at this map it should not be surprising that "Vlach-speakers" emerge in [I]Byzantine times[/I] 'from' all over Greece, Macedonia, and Albania, comprising the bulk and majority in many different regions.

tchaiku 04-18-2017 11:48 AM

In these times, their migratory lifestyle earned them a bad reputation. In 980 emperor Basil II conferred the dominion over the Vlachs of Thessaly on one Nicoulitza. The Vlachs in Thessaly and parts of Macedonia became very numerous [U][B]during the 11th century[/B][/U] revolt of the Vlachs in 1066 under their chieftain Verivoi, as attested by the Byzantine historian Kekaumenos, would provide total independence. As Kekaumenos records, a first revolt against imperial rule occurred in 1066, but it was not until after the collapse of the Empire in the Fourth Crusade that the Vlachs would s[B]et up their own, autonomous, [U]principality [/U][/B]- "[I]Great Wallachia[/I]". The chronicles of Nicetas Choniates, Benjamin of Tudela,[2] Geoffroy de Villehardouin, Henri de Valenciennes, Robert de Clary, and other sources account for the existence of this state, comprising Thessaly, as opposed to other two "Wallachias", "[I]Little Wallachia[/I]" in Acarnania and Aetolia, and an "[I]Upper Wallachia[/I]" in Epirus. This coincides with the period of the first Vlachian state entities across the Balkan Peninsula: Great Wallachia, Wallachia and Moldavia. Benjamin of Tudela, a Spanish Jew who visited Thessaly in 1173, describes the Vlachs as living in the mountains and coming down from them to [B]attack the [U]Greeks[/U][/B]. In relation with the Byzantine Empire, he adds: "[B][U]no Emperor can conquer them[/U][/B]".

[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Aromanians[/url]

D. Seward and S. Mountgarret - Byzantium: A Journey and a Guide; Harrap, London 1985 (p.183 etc.): Metsovo is the Greek capital of this shepherd race. After the Empire's temporary collapse in 1204 the Vlachs even set up their own kingdom of Great Wallachia
Jump up ^ Libro de Viages de Benjamin de Tudela, Volume VIII, p. 63.
Jump up ^ Libro de Viages de Benjamin de Tudela.

Amphipolis 04-18-2017 01:30 PM

[QUOTE=tchaiku;167843] As Kekaumenos records, a first revolt against imperial rule occurred in 1066, but it was not until after the collapse of the Empire in the Fourth Crusade that the Vlachs would s[B]et up their own, autonomous, [U]principality [/U][/B]- "[I]Great Wallachia[/I]". The chronicles of Nicetas Choniates, Benjamin of Tudela,[2] Geoffroy de Villehardouin, Henri de Valenciennes, Robert de Clary, and other sources account for the existence of this state, comprising Thessaly, as opposed to other two "Wallachias", "[I]Little Wallachia[/I]" in Acarnania and Aetolia, and an "[I]Upper Wallachia[/I]" in Epirus. [/QUOTE]

Cough, cough. Really? That sounds great. And what was the name of this principality? Was it "Great Wallachia"? Who was the king? What was its' policy? And how long did it last?

tchaiku 04-18-2017 01:58 PM

[QUOTE=Amphipolis;167844]Cough, cough. Really? That sounds great. And what was the name of this principality? Was it "Great Wallachia"? Who was the king? What was its' policy? And how long did it last?[/QUOTE]

That means that those Vlachs were so unruly towards Greeks (Romans) and Byzantine Empire that they wanted complete independence. This is also useful when it comes to Carlin's claims about Byzantine Empire being called Aromania.

So it indicates that they were a product of a migration and foreign to the empire.

Carlin 04-18-2017 08:46 PM

When Stefan Dušan conquered lands all the way up to Duchy of Athens, he called himself "Count of Vlachia." Settlements of Vlachs are also mentioned at that time in [B]Euboea[/B], the [B]Peloponnese[/B] and [B]even Crete[/B].

Source:
[I]Даскалов, Георги, Армъните в Гърция, Университетско издателство "Св. Климент Охридски", София, 2005, page 21[/I]

Carlin 04-18-2017 08:57 PM

[QUOTE=Amphipolis;167844]Cough, cough. Really? That sounds great. And what was the name of this principality? Was it "Great Wallachia"? Who was the king? What was its' policy? And how long did it last?[/QUOTE]

Please take a look at my post #426 on this same thread, and let me know if you need detailed translation.

As per the scan #426:
- Thessaly used to be called 'Great Vlachia' or 'Megali Vlachia', with the capital Larissa.
- The Chronicle of Epirus refers to 'Great Vlachia' as 'Greco-Vlachia'.
- 'Great Vlachia' was a [I]strong state[/I] during the decades of its ruler "Jovan I" (as written in Serbian), which was between 1258 and 1296.
- This Vlach state was under frequent attacks from Serbian rulers, as even the archbishop Danilo* noted - how king Milutin went with his army in order to conquer and plunder "drzhavu zemlye [U]Vlahiotske[/U]".

(Drzhava = state, Zemlya = country)

* - Danilo II: Zhivoti kraljeva i arhiepiskopa srpskih, izdao Djura Danicic Zagreb 1866, page 114.

Carlin 04-22-2017 06:13 AM

I am not aware of coming across this before - so I'm adding it here. It is found in a Bulgarian book, written by Yordan Ivanov.

[U]Footnote 3[/U] (the text in Greek) basically states that [I]the [B]Sklavini [/B]devastated all Thessaly, nearby islands and those of Helada, also the Cyclades along with entire Achaia, Epirus, the bigger part of Illyricum and part of Asia[/I].

[URL=http://s1074.photobucket.com/user/Carlin177/media/1_zpszjupngyg.png.html][IMG]http://i1074.photobucket.com/albums/w416/Carlin177/1_zpszjupngyg.png[/IMG][/URL]


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:56 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Macedonian Truth Organisation