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Old 09-22-2014, 12:43 PM   #111
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Now I see what you mean Philosopher. By that you are saying that it makes more meaning in macedonian than in greek.

However if you go into linguistics, you'll find that occam's razor is not always how it works.
No disagreements there. Perhaps others on this forum can enlighten us some more on this and other words, including, of course, Alexander.
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Old 09-22-2014, 12:46 PM   #112
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So how many derivatives of Vasil are there in macedonian? I think it's a good chance to find out how Vasil is used and its derivatives in the meaning of king. As in greek. Because this is a way to find out linguistically its meaning. If it is used in modern macedonian along with its derivatives in the sene of king.

Last edited by spitfire; 09-22-2014 at 01:49 PM.
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Old 09-22-2014, 01:58 PM   #113
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So how many derivatives of Vasil are there in macedonian? I think it's a good chance to find out how Vasil is used and its derivatives in the meaning of king. As in greek. Because this is a way to find out linguistically its meaning. If it is used in modern macedonian along with its derivatives in the sene of king.
In Macedonian, vasil is not the word for "king". The word for king is крал, or kral.

As far as I know, vasil is only a common name.

Maybe someone can provide more information on this.
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Old 09-22-2014, 02:10 PM   #114
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In Macedonian, vasil is not the word for "king". The word for king is крал, or kral.

As far as I know, vasil is only a common name.

Maybe someone can provide more information on this.
Just to make this clear. Vasil is one word right? A verb right?
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Old 09-22-2014, 02:49 PM   #115
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Just to make this clear. Vasil is one word right? A verb right?
One word. Not a verb. It is a name. So it would be a noun.

It is possible, however, that historically it may have been used differently. Perhaps someone knows better.
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Old 09-22-2014, 02:53 PM   #116
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Loot at it this way.

Vassileos in Greek is a name, right? Vasil in Macedonian is also a name. Vassileos in Greek stems from Vasileus or Basileus, king. In Greek, the word for king is the same. In Macedonian, they are different.

You have to bear in mind that "vasil" does not mean "king" in Macedonian. The argument put forth is that etymologically speaking, the elemental meaning of "Basil" is "(someone) in power". Out of this elementary definition, stems "Basil", "king".
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Old 09-22-2014, 02:56 PM   #117
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One word. Not a verb. It is a name. So it would be a noun.

It is possible, however, that historically it may have been used differently. Perhaps someone knows better.
If there are no other uses, then I'm afraid that there is less of correlation in macedonian than in greek.

For instance, it would be like saying that the name Napoleon makes more sense in Greek because it means "To say lion" meaning that nopoleon was a lion, therefore someone with power. It does not correlate.

We are looking for meanings and uses in order to find the signifier and the signified, so at this time I can't see any correlation of the name in macedonian.
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Old 09-22-2014, 03:02 PM   #118
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If there are no other uses, then I'm afraid that there is less of correlation in macedonian than in greek.

For instance, it would be like saying that the name Napoleon makes more sense in Greek because it means "To say lion" meaning that nopoleon was a lion, therefore someone with power. It does not correlate.

We are looking for meanings and uses in order to find the signifier and the signified, so at this time I can't see any correlation of the name in macedonian.
The word "Basileus" in Greek has no etymological meaning. It is a borrowed word. In Macedonian, "vasil" appears to be a more logical choice for the origin of "Basil" because it forms the elementary concept of someone in power, like a prince or a king.

An argument can be made that, like with most words, the word "Basileus" overtime took on the exclusive meaning "king" because the word evolved to mean specifically a king, rather than "in power".

There are many words that have root meanings, which, over time, expand and evolve.
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Old 09-22-2014, 03:08 PM   #119
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For instance, it would be like saying that the name Napoleon makes more sense in Greek because it means "To say lion" meaning that nopoleon was a lion, therefore someone with power. It does not correlate.
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This was an old Italian name, used most notably by the French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was born on Corsica. It is possibly derived from the Germanic Nibelungen, the name of a race of dwarfs in Germanic legend, which meant "sons of mist". Alternatively, it could be connected to the name of the Italian city of Napoli (Naples).
http://www.behindthename.com/name/napoleon

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Greek Meaning:
The name Napoleon is a Greek baby name. In Greek the meaning of the name Napoleon is: Of the new city.
http://www.sheknows.com/baby-names/name/napoleon
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Old 09-22-2014, 03:12 PM   #120
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If there are no other uses, then I'm afraid that there is less of correlation in macedonian than in greek.

For instance, it would be like saying that the name Napoleon makes more sense in Greek because it means "To say lion" meaning that nopoleon was a lion, therefore someone with power. It does not correlate.
It does not correlate because to suggest "to say lion" correlates with "in power" because a lion is powerful makes no sense Spitfire. To even suggest this is dishonest.

The odds that a word "Vasil" or "Basil" would be spelled the same and have a primitive elementary meaning of "in power" are not likely. You cannot compare this with "Napoleon".

Last edited by Philosopher; 09-22-2014 at 03:28 PM.
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