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Old 11-11-2020, 11:12 PM   #511
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A testimonial dated June 982 regarding an agreement between the inhabitants of Hierissos and John the Iberian, the founder of the Monastery of Iviron on Mount Athos, bears the signature of numerous persons with following names: Basil Stroimir, Vlasios Vladko, Nicholas Detko, Antony Rokovina. In addition, one of the signatures is in Glagolitic letters.
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Old 11-12-2020, 12:37 AM   #512
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Originally Posted by Carlin15 View Post
A testimonial dated June 982 regarding an agreement between the inhabitants of Hierissos and John the Iberian, the founder of the Monastery of Iviron on Mount Athos, bears the signature of numerous persons with following names: Basil Stroimir, Vlasios Vladko, Nicholas Detko, Antony Rokovina. In addition, one of the signatures is in Glagolitic letters.
All Greek to me.
Any copy of the document available?
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Old 11-15-2020, 12:54 PM   #513
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Originally Posted by Risto the Great View Post
All Greek to me.
Any copy of the document available?
Unfortunately, no.

Above quote is from Florin Curta's book "The Edinburgh History of the Greeks", page 174.
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Old 11-15-2020, 02:13 PM   #514
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlin15 View Post
A testimonial dated June 982 regarding an agreement between the inhabitants of Hierissos and John the Iberian, the founder of the Monastery of Iviron on Mount Athos, bears the signature of numerous persons with following names: Basil Stroimir, Vlasios Vladko, Nicholas Detko, Antony Rokovina. In addition, one of the signatures is in Glagolitic letters.
Hierissos was established around this period (late 800s, early 900s) which coincides with the arrival of a group from the North, mentioned in Greek sources as "Sclav Bulgarians" (which may also mean slave Bulgarians).
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Old 11-15-2020, 02:24 PM   #515
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Originally Posted by Amphipolis View Post
Hierissos was established around this period (late 800s, early 900s) which coincides with the arrival of a group from the North, mentioned in Greek sources as "Sclav Bulgarians" (which may also mean slave Bulgarians).
According to A. Kaldellis, "... that odd composite designation - 'Slav Bulgarians' - suggests that the Roman state distinguished between its own Slavs and Slav settlers from the Bulgarian empire."

Page 143, "Romanland" A. Kaldellis.
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Old 01-01-2021, 11:13 PM   #516
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URL:
http://wtf.tw/ref/tainter.pdf

Page 144:

"Many barbarians were enlisted in the military, indeed in the later Empire barbarian colonies were planted within the depopulated lands under Roman rule. Height requirements for military recruits were lowered."


Page 147:

"Contemporary records indicate that, more than once, both rich and poor wished that the barbarians would deliver them from the burdens of the Empire. While some of the civilian population resisted the barbarians (with varying degrees of earnestness), and many more were simply inert in the presence of the invaders, some actively fought for the barbarians. In 378, for example, Balkan miners went over en masse to the Visigoths. In Gaul the invaders were sometimes welcomed as liberators from the Imperial burden, and were even invited to occupy territory. To ensure doubtful loyalty of frontier areas, the government was an occasion forced to make up local deficits of grain.

Zosimus, a writer of the second half of the fifth century A.D., wrote of Thessaly and Macedonia that '...as a result of this exaction of taxes city and countryside were full of laments and complaints and all invoked the barbarians and sought the help of the barbarians' (quoted in Mazzarino [1966: 65]). 'By the fifth century,' concludes R. M. Adams, 'men were ready to abandon civilization itself in order to escape the fearful load of taxes' (1983: 47).

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Old 01-16-2021, 11:22 AM   #517
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Vasil Zhurka (Greek: Βασίλειος Ζούρκας, Vasilios Zurkas) was a fighter who operated in western Aegean Macedonia and Thessaly in the second half of the 19th century, and participated in the rebellion of 1878.

Vasil Zhurka was born in 1844 in the Vlach Macedonian town of Neveska. His family moved to Kostur for safety reasons, where he spent his childhood.

In 1870, with their younger brother Petar and their friend Dimitar Dalipo from Besvina, they stayed with their father's friend, the priest Dimitrios Anagnostu, in the village of Kalamitsi, Grevena region. The passing Turkish bandit Ali aga raped the daughter of the priest Anagnostu and Vasil Zhurka shot him. Vasil and Petar Zhurka and Dalipo killed three Turks and fled to the mountains, where they become bandits (klepths).

In 1871, in Ohrid, Zhurka set fire to the house of the Turkish kadi, who oppressed the local Christian population, and killed three of his ten-member guards, leaving a note.

Folk Song about V. Zhurka per Kuzman Shapkarev:
https://liternet.bg/folklor/sbornici...arev_1/382.htm
https://fr-fr.facebook.com/BitolaMK/...6643440748013/

ВАСИЛ ЖУРКА ГО УБИВА АЈДИТ МАЉА

Алал да му бидит на Васил Журка,
шчо ми собрал седумдесет мина,
седумдесет мина се млади момчиња,
се' млади момчиња и се' преспанчиња,
се' преспанчиња, се' Македончиња,
та шчо ми излегол млад арамија,
млад арамија во Преспанско Поле,
во Преспанско Поле, в Германска Планина.
Шчо се собрале сите Турците,
та ми отидоа во град Битола,
мезлич ми чинат жив да го фатат:
„Да се собериме до илјада души,
до илјада души се' башибозуци,
та да одиме во Преспанско Поле,
во Преспанско Поле, в Ѓерманска Планина".
Таман ќинисаа на пат да ми одат,
на пат да ми одат на Боунско Поле,
голем страв зедоа, назад се вратиа,
маана најдоа: туфеѕи немале.
Та што ми дочу тој Васил Журка,
от' по него идат илјада души,
илјада души се' башибозуци,
алал да му бидит пак на Васил Журка,
шчо ми написа онаа бела книга,
онаа бела книга, тоа црно писмо,
та си ја прати во град Битола,
дури во Битола, право на пашата:
„Да се соберите до десет илјади,
до десет илјади се' башибозуци,
ич страв немам од ваш башибозук!"
Од тука ми слезе тој Васил Журка,
од тука ми слезе во Корчанско Поле,
во Корчанско Поле, во селото Ѕвезда,
тука ми ги најде сите селани,
сите селани, сите чорбаџии,
та шчо нарача онај добар ручек,
онај добар ручек, до десет погачи,
до десет погачи, до десет преснеѕи,
ем рудо јагне и лута ракија.
Тие му рекоја: — „Да видит господ,
да видит господ од вас ајдути!
Сега овде беше тој ајдут Маљо,
нему му дадовме овај добар ручек!"
Тогај им рече тој Васил Журка:
„Ручек ви нејќум, право ми кажите,
право ми кажите за ајдут Маља,
за ајдут Маља каде отиде?"
„Сега ми слезе згора над лозјана."
Та шчо ми ојде тој Васил Журка,
та шчо му викна на ајдут Маља:
„Каде си го нашол овој добар ручек,
овај добор ручек и љута ракија.
А тој ајдут Маљо ракија ми пијат,
песна ми пеит, оро ми играт,
оро ми играт, нему му се смеит.
Алал да му бидит на Васил Журка,
шчо му наврти московска мартинка,
шчо ми го удри по десната страна.
Од тука откина пак ајдут Маљо,
та ми отиде во турска куќа.
По него трчат тој Васил Журка
каде отиде трага да ми најдит;
Трагата му најде во турската куќа,
умрен го најде, в земја закопан;
Та шчо натера тој домаќинот
од земја да г' извајт, с' јаже да го врзит.
Од земја г' изваде, с' фортома го врза,
кучиња му кладе него да го тргает;
Шчо го обеси на високо дрво,
на високо дрво тишки да го јадет.

Преземено од книгата: БИТОЛА БАБАМ БИТОЛА
Народни песни во кои се спомнува Битола,
Издадена: Битола, Октомври 1969 год

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Old 01-17-2021, 11:17 AM   #518
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Dimitrios Golnas (Димитриос Такис Голнас) was a Greek chieftain (of Vlach extraction) of the "Macedonian Struggle".

Golnas was born in the 1880s in Neveska (Nymfaio) of Lerin.

The spread of rumours that he was an agent of VMRO led the secret Greek organization "Athena" to issue an order for his extermination. When he learned of these rumours, he travelled to the Greek consulate of Bitola to ask for explanations from the Greek consul Nikolaos Xydakis. Golnas was declared innocent, but upon leaving the consulate, he fell into an ambush by an execution squad organized by the Greek Youth of Bitola*. Unaware of the latest developments, they attacked and seriously injured Golnas. He died during his transportation to the hospital, in 1908.

* - In 1905 the British Consul claimed that, although in about 70 percent of the houses the spoken language was Vlach, 'a very large majority' of them had received 'their instruction entirely in the Greek language and have come to regard themselves almost as belonging to that nationality'. [Public Record Office, Foreign Office (hereafter FO) 195/2208, Young to O'Conor, Monastir, 29 October 1905, f. 286.]

PS:

- A report submitted by a leading Vlach merchant to the Greek consulate mentions that after the establishment of railways, traders from the nearby towns of Prilep, Tikves, and Exi-Sou had settled in Bitola and started businesses in every commercial sector. According to this report the "infiltration of such traders" was part of a malicious master plan designed by VMRO to challenge Vlach (i.e. Greek) economic supremacy. The most dangerous competitors were the merchants from Prilep, as the British said, self-sufficient, frugal, audacious, ready to offer unlimited credit, with commercial connections in Solun.

i. FO 195/2156, Biliotti to O’Conor, Thessaloniki, 7 May 1903, f. 536.
ii. GFMA, F. 1905 Monastir Consulate, Spyros Doumas’s report, 31 January 1905
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Old 01-17-2021, 11:32 AM   #519
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Tsar Solomon and "Golden Age" of Tsar Simeon, By A. G. Vinogradov

Page 47:

- "The Wallachians inhabited Epirus. Wallachians are often mentioned in the 12th-14th centuries in Serbia, in Shar-Gory, in the mountains west of Beli Drina, near Ibar and Serbian Morava. In the 13th century, the Vlachs are mentioned in Macedonia in Skopje and Prilep. Many Vlachs lived in the Rhodope Mountains, where they are still present in Pernar and Nevrokop. In Anchial they are mentioned in 1095 and 1164, in Visa in Thrace in 1285. The Romans said about these Pontic Wallachians that they were descendants of Italian (Roman) colonists."

- "The Wallachian language in Thessaly was gradually replaced by Greek."

- "The Greeks in Macedonia were considered wicked cincars (vlachs)."
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Old 02-21-2021, 10:02 PM   #520
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Shepherds of the Romans

URL:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shepherds_of_the_Romans

The identification of the lowlands east of the Middle Danube as pasturing lands was first recorded in Emperor Constantine VII's De administrando imperio ("On Administering the Empire") in connection with the towns of Dalmatia. The Emperor wrote that "the Avars had their haunts on the far side of the river Danube", adding that the Dalmatians saw "the beasts and men on the far side of the river" when they visited the borderlands. In contrast with the Byzantine Emperor, Odo of Deuil who marched through Hungary in 1147 mentioned that the lands west of the river were said to have been the pasturing lands of Julius Caesar.

According to an early 13th-century report by one Friar Ricardus, a lost Hungarian chronicle—The Deeds of the Christian Hungarians—stated that Hungary had been called the pasturing lands of the Romans before the Magyars conquered it.

The identification of Hungary as the one-time pascua Romanorum ("the Romans' pasturing lands") was also mentioned in the Rhymed Chronicle of Stična from the 1240s, in Thomas the Archdeacon's History of the Bishops of Slanona and Split, which was written after 1250, and in the Anonymi descriptio Europae orientalis from the early 14th century.

On the other hand, Simon of Kéza and the 14th-century Hungarian chronicles did not refer to Hungary as the Romans' pasturing land. Instead, they wrote of the "shepherds and husbandmen" or the "farm-workers and shepherds" of the Roman citizens of Pannonia, Pamphylia, Macedonia, Dalmatia and Phrygia who stayed behind when their masters fled from these Roman provinces after the arrival of the Huns. Both Simon of Kéza and the 14th-century identified these "shepherds and husbandmen" as Vlachs.
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