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Old 06-03-2021, 12:42 PM   #991
Carlin
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Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
The word khatun/hatun (lady, woman), a Turkic word most likely borrowed from an Iranian language, was mentioned well before the 12th century. It wasn't common in the Balkans before the Ottoman occupation and without having read the text in question (or knowing much about this Ioannes Trachaniotes), I'm not sure how it came to be that an Athonite monk would have used it in the year 1109.
That's a very interesting proposed connection/origin of the word. I'm not sure how the term "Katun" became associated with Vlachs.

Here is a random site, which defines "what" was a Katun - but doesn't go into the origin of the term:
https://dictionary.university/Katun
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Old 06-03-2021, 11:53 PM   #992
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That's a very interesting proposed connection/origin of the word. I'm not sure how the term "Katun" became associated with Vlachs.

Here is a random site, which defines "what" was a Katun - but doesn't go into the origin of the term:
https://dictionary.university/Katun
I mentioned khatun/hatun because of the reference to Vlach women in the screenshots you posted. If katun was meant as something else (like settlements) then it is probably a different word that coincidentally looks very similar. Page 623 of Fine's book doesn't go into the origin of the term either.
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Old 06-18-2021, 11:34 PM   #993
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By the end of the 15th century, the influence of the Italian language and culture (including in some ways the Roman Catholic church) assumed a predominant role in the island (Corfu).

Until the second half of the 20th century the Veneto da mar was spoken in Corfu, and the local Greek language assimilated a large number of Italian and Venetian words, many of which are still common today. Indeed, even before the fall of the Byzantine Empire much of the population in Corfu spoke the Veneto da mar or the Mediterranean Lingua Franca Sabir as a second, or first, language.

According to historian Ezio Gray, the small communities of Venetian-speaking people in Corfu were mostly assimilated after the island became part of Greece in 1864 and especially after all Italian schools were closed in 1870. However, the Italian language maintained some importance, as can be seen by the fact that poets like Stefano Martzokis (Marzocchi was the surname of the father, an Italian from Emilia-Romagna) and Geranimos Markonos, the first from Corfù and the second from Cefalonia, wrote some of their poems in Italian during the second half of the 19th century.

URL:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corfiot_Italians
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Old 06-18-2021, 11:48 PM   #994
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In 1878, many Arvanitovlachs took part in the revolutionary movement against the Turks and after its failure, left for Corfu and Lefkada. In Corfu, most settled in Gatitsa. G. Weigand, in 1889, writes that the Arvanitovlachs of Corfu numbered about 2,000 families.
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Old 06-19-2021, 02:48 AM   #995
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Originally Posted by Carlin View Post
By the end of the 15th century, the influence of the Italian language and culture (including in some ways the Roman Catholic church) assumed a predominant role in the island (Corfu).

Until the second half of the 20th century the Veneto da mar was spoken in Corfu, and the local Greek language assimilated a large number of Italian and Venetian words, many of which are still common today. Indeed, even before the fall of the Byzantine Empire much of the population in Corfu spoke the Veneto da mar or the Mediterranean Lingua Franca Sabir as a second, or first, language.

According to historian Ezio Gray, the small communities of Venetian-speaking people in Corfu were mostly assimilated after the island became part of Greece in 1864 and especially after all Italian schools were closed in 1870. However, the Italian language maintained some importance, as can be seen by the fact that poets like Stefano Martzokis (Marzocchi was the surname of the father, an Italian from Emilia-Romagna) and Geranimos Markonos, the first from Corfù and the second from Cefalonia, wrote some of their poems in Italian during the second half of the 19th century.

URL:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corfiot_Italians
Regarding the piece in bold about the Italian schools - the Greeks sure move swiftly! I often question though whether the assimilated peoples suffer from Stockholm syndrome and quite like the notion of being “descendants of the ancients”.
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Old 07-04-2021, 12:57 PM   #996
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URL:
https://www.academia.edu/48876353/AR..._MODERN_GREECE

Page 22: "Vangelis Liapis, a scholar and author of several books on Arvanites would say: One day at school, in history class, I was courageous and asked the teacher why the book does not say that those who brought freedom to Greece were Arvanites? The answer I got was two fierce slaps followed by silence. It was the second injury that was slowly starting to create a wound in my soul."

Page 238: "Giannis Lazaris writes about why they are called Greeks today: Greeks did not exist even as a name. And there were no Greeks during the Ottoman period, of course. The inhabitants of the area of Greece were citizens of the Ottoman Empire, Romiots, i.e., Christians where some of whom spoke Romeika (who are abusively called Greeks today) and many other Arvanites, Vlachs, Turks, etc."
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