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Old 08-08-2011, 06:43 PM   #71
Soldier of Macedon
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Originally Posted by Delodephius View Post
To continue on my previous post. I have been searching for the meaning of these endings in many Germanic names: -mir, -mer, -mar, -mær. I finally found just a reference in one book of mine that it means "famous", "glorious", originally from Proto-Germanic meri.
I don't recall where I read it, but I am sure I have seen the name Slavic Vladimer (as opposed to Vladimir) explained as -mer meaning 'great'. As for 'mir', would it be related to Greek ειρήνη meaning 'peace'?
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Now, when Slavs use the ending -mir in their names, this might just be a relic of the Germanic names, since in Slavic mir means "peace" or "world" and several names that contain it make no sense if we apply this etymology.
Worthy of further research. A parallel example that could be cited is the Slavic Bogomil as opposed to Greek Theophilus. Which Slavic names are you thinking about? If we use Branimir as an example, it would mean 'peaceful defender', or 'glorious defender' if we use the Germanic definition of the word -mir, but then the latter would make more sense in Slavic as Branislav.
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