De situ Illyriae et civitate Sibenici by Juraj Šižgorić (1487)

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  • TrueMacedonian
    Senior Member
    • Jan 2009
    • 3820

    De situ Illyriae et civitate Sibenici by Juraj Šižgorić (1487)

    Juraj Šižgorić, or Georgius Sisgoreus, was a poet and historiographer from Sibenik, Croatia. In 1487 the book De situ Illyriae et civitate Sibenici (On the location of Illyria and the city of Sibenik), a historico- geographical treatise, written by Šižgorić constructed the borders of Illyria in which he starts with Hungary and ends with Macedonia. He also included the first ever catalogue of thirty 'Illyrian' tribes using ethnonyms from classical authors.

    The little info we have of this book pertaining to Macedonia is from here - http://www.heraldika.org.mk/eng/oldest.htm - which is only what I have confirmed only using a different source (which does not include "Greece" as the article in heraldika does).

    Can anyone please help provide more info? Even images of the front cover?
    Slayer Of The Modern "greek" Myth!!!
  • pluto
    Junior Member
    • Jun 2010
    • 6

    #2
    I found this, http://ffzg.hr/klafil/croala/cgi-bin...ate.pl?laud.22 from the Faculti of Phiposophy in Zagreb. It should be digitalized version of the book, but i'm not sure if it's finished completelly. Also is not translated it's in latin . On this link http://ffzg.hr/klafil/croala/cgi-bin...?dbname=croala you can find other croatian authors starting from 1200 till present day, which i also think are only partly digitalized.

    Probably a contact should be made with the Hrvati to promote all these cultural heritage to more people other than scolars.
    Last edited by pluto; 12-18-2010, 07:26 AM.

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    • Soldier of Macedon
      Senior Member
      • Sep 2008
      • 13675

      #3
      Contributors to this volume seek to reconsider the heritage of discourses of patriotism and national allegiance in East Central Europe between the sixteenth and the eighteenth centuries. It results from an international research project, The Intellectual History of Patriotism and the Legacy of Composite States in East Central Europe, which brought together scholars to discuss the problem of patriotism in the light of the many levels of ethnic, cultural and political allegiances characterizing East Central Europe in early modern times. The authors analyze the complex process of the formation, reception and transmission of early modern discourses of collective identity in a regional context. Along these lines, the contributors also seek to reconfigure the geographical focus of scholarship on this topic and integrate the Eastern European contexts into the broader European discussion.






      In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.

      Comment

      • Soldier of Macedon
        Senior Member
        • Sep 2008
        • 13675

        #4
        "This is history as it should be written. In When Ethnicity Did Not Matter in the Balkans, a logical advancement on his earlier studies, Fine has successfully tackled a fascinating historical question, one having broad political implications for our own times. Fine's approach is to demonstrate how ideas of identity and self-identity were invented and evolved in medieval and early-modern times. At the same time, this book can be read as a critique of twentieth-century historiography-and this makes Fine's contribution even more valuable. This book is an original, much-needed contribution to the field of Balkan studies." -Steve Rapp, Associate Professor of Caucasian, Byzantine, and Eurasian History, and Director, Program in World History and Cultures Department of History, Georgia State University Atlanta When Ethnicity Did Not Matter in the Balkans is a study of the people who lived in what is now Croatia during the Middle Ages (roughly 600-1500) and the early-modern period (1500-1800), and how they identified themselves and were identified by others. John V. A. Fine, Jr., advances the discussion of identity by asking such questions as: Did most, some, or any of the population of that territory see itself as Croatian? If some did not, to what other communities did they consider themselves to belong? Were the labels attached to a given person or population fixed or could they change? And were some people members of several different communities at a given moment? And if there were competing identities, which identities held sway in which particular regions? In When Ethnicity Did Not Matter in the Balkans, Fine investigates the identity labels (and their meaning) employed by and about the medieval and early-modern population of the lands that make up present-day Croatia. Religion, local residence, and narrow family or broader clan all played important parts in past and present identities. Fine, however, concentrates chiefly on broader secular names that reflect attachment to a city, region, tribe or clan, a labeled people, or state. The result is a magisterial analysis showing us the complexity of pre-national identity in Croatia, Dalmatia, and Slavonia. There can be no question that the medieval and early-modern periods were pre-national times, but Fine has taken a further step by demonstrating that the medieval and early-modern eras in this region were also pre-ethnic so far as local identities are concerned. The back-projection of twentieth-century forms of identity into the pre-modern past by patriotic and nationalist historians has been brought to light. Though this back-projection is not always misleading, it can be; Fine is fully cognizant of the danger and has risen to the occasion to combat it while frequently remarking in the text that his findings for the Balkans have parallels elsewhere. John V. A. Fine, Jr. is Professor of History at the University of Michigan.



        In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.

        Comment

        • Soldier of Macedon
          Senior Member
          • Sep 2008
          • 13675

          #5
          This dates the claim to an Illyrian heritage for Slavic-speaking peoples even earlier than Pribojevic.
          In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.

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