The Miladinov Brothers & Macedonian Literature - 19th Century

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  • Daskalot
    replied
    Originally posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
    Daskale, how are we going with this?


    Source: "Macedonia and the Macedonians: A History" by Andrew Rossos, 2008, page 84.

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  • Soldier of Macedon
    replied
    Originally posted by Daskalot View Post
    I have a quote were the Miladinov brothers explain why they labeled their book "B'lgarski" Narodni Pesni, I will post it later it will give us a new light on the issue.
    Daskale, how are we going with this?

    Leave a comment:


  • Pelister
    replied
    Alot of Macedonian literature was lost during the 19th century, and I know of a number of bon fires, particularly in the town of Strumica and Prilep, where many books had been burned, and who knows what had actually been lost.

    But, there is enough Macedonian literature from the 19th century that has survived, and this is as good a place as any to talk post what is known about it.

    There seems to be some confusion between 'Macedonian' and 'Bulgarian' in some of the compilations of poems, and this has given the colonial regime of Bulgaria some arsenal against us, so exploring that issue is important.

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  • Daskalot
    replied
    Originally posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
    There is a plethora of Macedonian literature from the 19th century written in the native tongue which demonstrates beyond any doubt the existence of the Macedonian language and its rich dialects.

    While in the literature, the Macedonian name was not always employed, particularly during the earlier years of the national awakening, the local Macedonian vernacular most certainly was used. Hence, one only need read a song or poem recorded by the likes of the Miladinov Brothers from Macedonia to realize that despite the terminology used what exists there is purely literature in the Macedonian language.

    This thread will serve the purpose of revealing the many examples of the abovementioned literature.
    I have a quote were the Miladinov brothers explain why they labeled their book "B'lgarski" Narodni Pesni, I will post it later it will give us a new light on the issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Risto the Great
    replied
    The native tongue is a very important point.
    I believe the Germans abandoned Latin in the Catholic church in the 1950's.
    Macedonians were merely victims in the Ottoman empire prior to the 19th century awakening ... just like all the countries in the Balkans. They were not "working on an identity" during the Ottoman oppression. They were being suppressed for 500 years. And still had defining ethnic characteristics.

    Look how fast Macedonians progressed in such a short time since freedom from the Ottoman yoke. This cultural identity simply does not appear over night. It is the culmination of millenniums of evolution. The local vernacular was very complete during Misirkov and far earlier. The notion that the Old Church Macedonian Slavonic is different to modern Macedonian is as stupid as Latin versus Italian. What is curious is the fundamental similarities and the obvious evolution of the language. Not sure we can say the same about evolution of a language for our southern neighbours though.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Miladinov Brothers & Macedonian Literature - 19th Century

    There is a plethora of Macedonian literature from the 19th century written in the native tongue which demonstrates beyond any doubt the existence of the Macedonian language and its rich dialects.

    While in the literature, the Macedonian name was not always employed, particularly during the earlier years of the national awakening, the local Macedonian vernacular most certainly was used. Hence, one only need read a song or poem recorded by the likes of the Miladinov Brothers from Macedonia to realize that despite the terminology used what exists there is purely literature in the Macedonian language.

    This thread will serve the purpose of revealing the many examples of the abovementioned literature.
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