Macedonian Cuisine/Food

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  • lavce pelagonski
    Senior Member
    • Nov 2009
    • 1993

    Macedonian Cuisine/Food

    Well its time we had a thread about Macedonian food. If you could provide pictures and recipes it would make it easy for us to try out something new.

    Macedonian smoked Sausages





    Maznik with goats cheese.





    Pikerki luti so luk turshija

    Стравот на Атина од овој Македонец одел до таму што го нарекле „Страшниот Чакаларов“ „гркоубиец“ и „крвожеден комитаџија“.

    „Ако знам дека тука тече една капка грчка крв, јас сега би ја отсекол целата рака и би ја фрлил в море.“ Васил Чакаларов
  • lavce pelagonski
    Senior Member
    • Nov 2009
    • 1993

    #2
    YouTube - ‪The food in Macedonia‬‏
    Стравот на Атина од овој Македонец одел до таму што го нарекле „Страшниот Чакаларов“ „гркоубиец“ и „крвожеден комитаџија“.

    „Ако знам дека тука тече една капка грчка крв, јас сега би ја отсекол целата рака и би ја фрлил в море.“ Васил Чакаларов

    Comment

    • The LION will ROAR
      Senior Member
      • Jan 2009
      • 3231

      #3


      Шопска салата
      The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

      Comment

      • The LION will ROAR
        Senior Member
        • Jan 2009
        • 3231

        #4


        pleskavici so grafce
        The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

        Comment

        • The LION will ROAR
          Senior Member
          • Jan 2009
          • 3231

          #5


          kiflina or Solenki are savoury baked snacks with a bread-like texture. They usually have a filling of some sort such as feta, and they are usually scattered with sesame seeds.
          Last edited by The LION will ROAR; 06-27-2011, 10:32 AM.
          The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

          Comment

          • The LION will ROAR
            Senior Member
            • Jan 2009
            • 3231

            #6


            Tavče Gravče (Baked Beans)

            The ultimate comfort food, Macedonian baked beans are cooked slowly with paprika powder, Macedonian salami (kolbasi) or minced meat patties.
            The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

            Comment

            • The LION will ROAR
              Senior Member
              • Jan 2009
              • 3231

              #7


              Ajvar

              Ajvar is one of the most popular foods in the Balkans, and it holds a special place in Macedonian cuisine. It is a red capsicum relish with eggplant and other ingredients. It is best eaten with freshly baked bread and cheese. Simple but unbeatable.
              The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

              Comment

              • The LION will ROAR
                Senior Member
                • Jan 2009
                • 3231

                #8


                Polneti Piperki

                Stuffed Capsicums are a favourite too. Large red bell peppers are stuffed with minced meat, rice, eggplant and whatever else. They are baked in the oven with potatoes and served
                The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

                Comment

                • The LION will ROAR
                  Senior Member
                  • Jan 2009
                  • 3231

                  #9
                  I remember watching mum make Maznik early in the mornings...best Macedonian pastry




                  Maznik Pastry

                  Maznik is probably the best known Macedonian pastry dish, consisting of a very long roll of pastry rolled up with a filling, typically feta cheese (sireńe) and coiled up into a circle, to be cut into pizza-like slices.

                  While it is eaten during the year, it forms a tradition on Macedonian New Year, which is 14th January. Everybody in the household sits for maznik on new years day, and a piece is cut for every person in the house, sometimes a piece is allocated for the house itself. A gold coin is placed in the Maznik, and the dish is spun several times (usually three). Each household member takes a slice of the maznik and whoever's slice holds the gold coin will have good luck for the year.
                  The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

                  Comment

                  • The LION will ROAR
                    Senior Member
                    • Jan 2009
                    • 3231

                    #10

                    Grilled Chillies (Pecheni Piperki)
                    The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

                    Comment

                    • The LION will ROAR
                      Senior Member
                      • Jan 2009
                      • 3231

                      #11


                      Macedonian kebapi
                      A combination of minced beef and pork rolled together with garlic and other spices, served with red pepper, onions, and french fries.
                      The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

                      Comment

                      • The LION will ROAR
                        Senior Member
                        • Jan 2009
                        • 3231

                        #12


                        Sarma is a dish of grape, cabbage or chard leaves rolled around a filling usually based on minced meat. It is part of a traditional Macedonian cuisine, but also, it can be found in the Turkish and Serbian cuisine. The name of this dish, has turkish origins, and means “wrapped thing”.
                        The Macedonians originates it, the Bulgarians imitate it and the Greeks exploit it!

                        Comment

                        • lavce pelagonski
                          Senior Member
                          • Nov 2009
                          • 1993

                          #13
                          Pogacha (Pogaca, Погача) version 1
                          Hi guys, so holidays are gone and hopefully I'll have more time to write on this blog. Many of you e-mailed me about recipe for pogacha (pogaca, погача), which I assume that is the sweet version you're looking for. Well, I have three different recipes for sweet version of pogacha, so you can choose which one you want to make. This is the first version:

                          Recipe:
                          1000 gr flour
                          150 ml milk
                          250 ml yogurt
                          50 ml vegetable oil
                          2 eggs
                          1 cube (or package) yeast
                          100 gr sugar
                          125 gr butter
                          pinch of salt
                          water (if needed)

                          If you're using frozen yeast cube, warm the milk a little bit, dissolve the yeast into it and then add and dissolve the sugar in it. If you use package of dry yeast, the milk can be cold, just dissolve the sugar and yeast in it. Sift the flour, mix the pinch of salt in it and then add the milk with the dissolved sugar and yeast, the yogurt and oil. In a bowl crack one egg, and from the second one just add the egg white. Keep the yolk for egg paint. Beat the egg and egg white and add them to the flour and other ingredients. Mix everything until it's soft and smooth dough (add water if it's too hard or flour if it's too soft). Knead the dough until smooth, shape it into ball, and leave it to rest until the size of it has doubled (approximately 1 hour in warm place). When the dough has raised, roll it into rectangle and spread 1/3 of the butter on top of it. Overlap the dough one half on the other (like you're closing a book). Spread the second 1/3 of the butter and overlap again. Then spread again and overlap again. Roll the dough in 2 cm thickness and cut it into equal pieces (cubes). Shape each piece into ball (the size should be like golf ball) and into place it in the center of a greased round baking pan. Shape the other pieces into balls and arrange them to the center piece so you'll have flower shape. Keep arranging the dough balls until you use all dough. Add 1 tablespoon of water into the egg yolk and beat it well. Spread the egg paint onto the pogacha and sprinkle it with little bit of sugar. Leave the pogacha to rest for 10 minutes (until the oven is heated). Heat the oven to 200 degrees C and bake the pogacha for 10 minutes. Lower the heat to 180 degrees C and bake for 20-25 min more (until the sides of the pogacha are brownish). When the pogacha is baked, take it out of the oven and cover it firs with some clean thick plastic bag (the plastic foil might melt), and on top of the bag place a kitchen towel. Leave it to cool like this. Then you just break pieces of it and eat:-)
                          Стравот на Атина од овој Македонец одел до таму што го нарекле „Страшниот Чакаларов“ „гркоубиец“ и „крвожеден комитаџија“.

                          „Ако знам дека тука тече една капка грчка крв, јас сега би ја отсекол целата рака и би ја фрлил в море.“ Васил Чакаларов

                          Comment

                          • lavce pelagonski
                            Senior Member
                            • Nov 2009
                            • 1993

                            #14
                            Macedonian grilled vegetable salad recipe


                            Serves eight as a side dish or as meze

                            This is not like an Italian roast vegetable salad, but is so soft it's almost a purιe. It's perfect with lamb kebabs.

                            4 peppers, all red or a mixture of red and yellow
                            olive oil
                            4 plum tomatoes, halved
                            2 aubergines
                            4 cloves garlic, crushed
                            Ό tsp dried chilli flakes
                            2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
                            juice of ½ lemon
                            1½ tbsp red-wine vinegar

                            Halve, core and deseed the peppers and brush all over with olive oil. Put some foil on the grill pan and set the peppers on this. Add the tomatoes and drizzle with oil. Season. Put under a hot grill and cook until both vegetables are scorched in places. Turn the heat down and cook until tender. You will need to remove the tomatoes first. Put the vegetables with their cooking juices into a bowl.

                            Pierce the aubergines all over so that they won't burst then hold each one with tongs over a naked flame on the hob. Cook all over. The skins should be scorched and the aubergines completely tender. It takes a while but be patient. If you don't have a gas hob, grill your aubergines instead. Halve them lengthways, paint with olive oil, season and cook on both sides until golden and tender. It doesn't produce anything like the smoky flavour achieved by a proper flame but it's better than not eating the dish at all. Either way, leave the aubergines to cool a bit then remove the skin. Cut the flesh into small cubes.

                            Стравот на Атина од овој Македонец одел до таму што го нарекле „Страшниот Чакаларов“ „гркоубиец“ и „крвожеден комитаџија“.

                            „Ако знам дека тука тече една капка грчка крв, јас сега би ја отсекол целата рака и би ја фрлил в море.“ Васил Чакаларов

                            Comment

                            • George S.
                              Senior Member
                              • Aug 2009
                              • 10116

                              #15
                              how about tavce gravce??
                              "Ido not want an uprising of people that would leave me at the first failure, I want revolution with citizens able to bear all the temptations to a prolonged struggle, what, because of the fierce political conditions, will be our guide or cattle to the slaughterhouse"
                              GOTSE DELCEV

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