Mike Ilitch/Ilievski

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  • Bij
    Member
    • Oct 2009
    • 905

    #46
    Originally posted by osiris View Post
    Here are some stats according to my fathers oral historical knowledge of our area. My fathers village dragosh over 100 families. There were 4 ski and 3 n suffixes the rest were ov or ev. My mothers lazhets 150 plus families only one from ski and they were from buf. Surrounding villages opsorina 50 plus families all ended in v. Bitusha 70 houses only one ended in ski and even here in Australia despite the imposition of Greek names the ski ending was used for that family. In sveta petka one ski. Gradeshnitsa no skis
    Velusjhina no ski. Kanina there were no ski only the martyred partisan kloe povov becameKOLE Kaninski His Serbian era name was Todorovic tha name he finished his law degree in Belgrade today on his grave and statute he is Todorovski a name derived from his Serbian one not the one he was known by in his village even during Serbian times
    In klabuchischa there were two families with ski. Have a look at the memorial to the illindendead from the selo of tsapari. They are all except one n ov or ev. Today in tsapari nearly all have ski except three n and ten or so with v. I think the famous oz cricket player lenny Pascoe who's name was paskovitch I think that John gastev the oz footballer is also from tsapari so there may be others abroad who I don't know about and cannot comment.
    lenny pascoe was born leonard stephen durtanovich. he was harassed by other cricketers for being a wog and changed his surname according to his dedo's name - Pasko

    Back to Ilitch. From Wikipedia:

    Philanthropy

    One of Ilitch's first philanthropic efforts was the Little Caesars Love Kitchen, established in 1985. The traveling restaurant was formed to feed the hungry and assist with food provisions during national disasters – most recently helping the flood victims and volunteers in North Dakota. The program has been recognized by former Presidents Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush and Ronald Reagan, and has served more than 2 million individuals in the United States and Canada.

    In 2006, inspired by a veteran returning to civilian life after losing both of his legs in war, Ilitch founded the Little Caesars Veterans Program to provide honorably discharged veterans with a business opportunity when they transition from service or seek a career change. Ilitch received the Secretary’s Award from the U.S. Department of Veterans affairs for this program in 2007; it is the highest honor given to a civilian by the department. Today there are 50 Little Caesars Veteran franchisees who have applied more than $1.5 million in benefits.

    The Little Caesars Amateur Hockey Program, established by Ilitch in 1968, has provided opportunities for tens of thousands of youngsters over the years. Not only has it paved the way for a number of extremely talented players to make it to the NHL, it has helped develop character on and off the ice for those who have participated in the program.

    Additionally, Ilitch Charities for Children was founded in 2000 as a non-profit foundation dedicated to improving the lives of children in the areas of health, education and recreation. In 2008, the charity was renamed Ilitch Charities and its focus was broadened. The new charity invests in the community’s future by supporting innovative, collaborative and measurable programs that promote economic development and spur job growth, as a means to address social issues such as poverty, unemployment, homelessness, and hunger.

    According to the Center for Responsive Politics, reports required by the Federal Elections Commission from 2002-2005 indicate Ilitch Holdings, Inc. members and business partners have contributed more than $500,000 to political campaigns and PACs.[11]
    What political campaigns did he contribute to? Bush perhaps?

    Comment

    • Niko777
      Senior Member
      • Oct 2010
      • 1895

      #47
      What political campaigns did he contribute to? Bush perhaps?
      Nope. The Ilitch family are democrats.

      Comment

      • fyrOM
        Banned
        • Feb 2010
        • 2180

        #48
        Originally posted by Niko777 View Post
        Nope. The Ilitch family are democrats.
        Is that the same Democrats that love and support the Greeks?

        Comment

        • Bij
          Member
          • Oct 2009
          • 905

          #49
          Why is everyone trying to rip Ilitch? Is this tall poppy syndrome????

          Seems to me like no one has any personal gripes against this man. Has this guy done anything to anyone personally?

          Sorry I don't know much about him other than what I've read online.

          Does anyone know if he as any single offspring for Bij?????????????

          Comment

          • fyrOM
            Banned
            • Feb 2010
            • 2180

            #50
            Originally posted by Bij View Post
            Does anyone know if he as any single offspring for Bij?????????????
            Good one Bij...hahaha...but you are going to have to learn to cook pizza.

            Comment

            • osiris
              Senior Member
              • Sep 2008
              • 1969

              #51
              thanks for the correction b j. Macedonians love to expect others to be patriotic and generous
              In my experience o have found rich Macedonians to be the least patriotic. The illich family have made their fortune in their lifetime it is np wonder they are democrats given they are both the children of factory workers from Detroit one of the democratic heartlands

              Comment

              • Louis Riel
                Member
                • Aug 2010
                • 190

                #52
                Fuck the Red Wings!

                Comment

                • Soldier of Macedon
                  Senior Member
                  • Sep 2008
                  • 13675

                  #53
                  Originally posted by Risto the Great View Post
                  Not disagreeing with too much but to say India is a good example ... well I can't draw a bow that long. Other than being under the same national flag, these various peoples could just as easily be in any other country. The border means very little in relation to their ethnic identity. Their national identity is well identified, but anything else is extremely blurry. More blurry than it is for Macedonians.
                  Indians themselves are well aware of the differences between each of their respective sub-groups or ethnicities. But I should have been more specific, what I had in mind did not include Dravidian (southern) India, but Aryan (northern) India - specifically Hindi-speaking states (not including other languages derived from Sanskrit such as Punjabi, Gujarati, etc). Although these people share the same language and religion, their culture is so rich that each region would have particular characteristics that are unique from others, however, they are all still regarded as forming part of Indian culture.
                  SoM, I’m looking at this from a clinical perspective, as it is an issue I need to deal with in one of my current academic endeavours.
                  I know mate, and I hope our discussions will open your mind to alternative views other than those you currently hold.
                  Regardless, the point I was trying to make is that neither culture nor language determine identity. If they did, the both of us would be closer to Englishmen than Macedonians........
                  Most Macedonians here know Macedonian because that is what has been passed on to them by their parents as a native and hereditary language; it therefore constitutes a cultural characteristic that contributes to the definition of a Macedonian ethnicity. The English language, on the other hand, which is not native, hereditary or pertinent to Macedonian ethnicity, is only learned because of its status as a medium in general society, government, schools and other official organs, and not because it is being passed on from their parents (although I admit, we are getting to the point where parents are using both Macedonian and English with their children, and in some cases mostly or solely English, which is a concern).
                  .......how can we point to culture (in any ethnonational group) as a ‘marker’ of identity, when not all members of the ethnonational group adhere to cultural traits that may be deemed as ‘necessary’ for belonging?
                  The only 'necessities' I consider in this regard are for cultural characteristics to have been developed by Macedonians based on Macedonian habits or practices, and not necessarily used by all Macedonians or originating in Macedonia proper either. Complete uniformity in terms of traditions and customs in any country or for any people is impossible to establish, and would only be likely in a discriminative and monocratic-type of society.
                  .......I know many Macedonians in Australia that do not speak Macedonian, do not practice any Macedonian traditions or customs, do not attend Macedonian events and for the most part do not even mix with other Macedonians, and are generally not interested in anything Macedonian.
                  I know few that fit into that category. If they still identify as Macedonians, then they do so based on their ancestry alone (which is one of the other primary indicators that I mentioned). Otherwise, there is nothing else that defines them as Macedonians. I don't accept the Greek 'formula' in which anybody who says they are 'Greek' can be Greek - the Macedonian identity isn't that ambiguous and fickle.
                  I was referring to the argument that just because the political elite among the ancient Macedonians spoke Greek and practised Greek culture, that in itself did not mean they were Greek. In that case, many on the forum, including yourself, have conclusively argued that language and culture do not define identity.
                  The Greek language and culture were foreign and not native to Macedonians, therefore not required to define the Macedonian identity. Nor is the French language and culture required to define a Tunisian, for example.
                  ....research as conclusively demonstrated that a majority of Austrians do not consider themselves Germans (even historically) but identify as a separate ethnonational group.
                  Perhaps (at least after WWII), but the difference between the Austrians and Germans has more to do with politics than history and ethno-linguistics. While one would probably be tempted to draw a parallel with the Macedonians and Bulgarians, there are more fundamental differences that need to be considered, not least the aspect of ancestry (collectively, Macedonians do not and have not identified with a foreign Turkic Bulgar element as their ancestry).
                  My premise still remains that defining an ethnonational group is impossible.
                  In my opinion, one must allow for historical evolution and other factors, otherwise such a premise would render all modern ethnicities as artificial and the result of political constructs, and while politics have certainly played their part, they are not the defining factor in most ethnic identities today - certainly not the Macedonian one.
                  In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.

                  Comment

                  • Vangelovski
                    Senior Member
                    • Sep 2008
                    • 8533

                    #54
                    Originally posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
                    The only 'necessities' I consider in this regard are for cultural characteristics to have been developed by Macedonians based on Macedonian habits or practices, and not necessarily used by all Macedonians or originating in Macedonia proper either. Complete uniformity in terms of traditions and customs in any country or for any people is impossible to establish, and would only be likely in a discriminative and monocratic-type of society.
                    I think this is a circular argument. If we say Macedonians are people who practice Macedonian culture and then ask what is Macedonian culture, only to answer by stating its developed by Macedonians (based on 'Macedonian habits or practices', which can be queried again) then we come back to what is a Macedonian again.

                    Further, how can culture be a primary 'marker' of Macedonian identity if Macedonian culture is not practised by all Macedonians? By your own admission, not all Macedonians practice Macedonian culture and uniformity is impossible to establish in this regard. How then do we define Macedonians who do not practice Macedonian culture (whatever that is, for both contemporary and past Macedonians)? According to these 'markers', they are not Macedonian, and yet we instinctively know this is incorrect.

                    Originally posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
                    In my opinion, one must allow for historical evolution and other factors, otherwise such a premise would render all modern ethnicities as artificial and the result of political constructs, and while politics have certainly played their part, they are not the defining factor in most ethnic identities today - certainly not the Macedonian one.
                    I'm not so sure that ideology is not a defining factor of identity. Many people that we consider Macedonians were quite happy little Yugoslavs 20 years ago and others have become Greeks, whose ancestors (Macedonians) are long forgotten.

                    For the record, I don't consider self-identification as definitive either, for the simple fact that if a Japanese man declared himself to be Macedonian, noone would take him seriously.
                    If my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sins and restore their land. 2 Chronicles 7:14

                    The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments, of their duties and obligations...This radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people was the real American Revolution. John Adams

                    Comment

                    • Phoenix
                      Senior Member
                      • Dec 2008
                      • 4671

                      #55
                      Originally posted by Vangelovski View Post
                      For the record, I don't consider self-identification as definitive either, for the simple fact that if a Japanese man declared himself to be Macedonian, noone would take him seriously.
                      That sounds like you're making physical distinctions in regards to the criteria for self-identification.

                      Self-identification doesn't exist in any physical sense, in DNA or on the basis of language, self-identification only exists in the realm of the mind...

                      Comment

                      • Vangelovski
                        Senior Member
                        • Sep 2008
                        • 8533

                        #56
                        Originally posted by Phoenix View Post
                        That sounds like you're making physical distinctions in regards to the criteria for self-identification.

                        Self-identification doesn't exist in any physical sense, in DNA or on the basis of language, self-identification only exists in the realm of the mind...
                        I did not intend to make a 'physical' distinction - Japanese just popped into my head. We can say German, French, Italian, Russian or whatever instead. It was merely an example of someone who is considered to be of a certain ethnonationality to 'switch' to another and the likelihood of them being accepted as such.
                        Last edited by Vangelovski; 03-13-2011, 06:40 AM.
                        If my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sins and restore their land. 2 Chronicles 7:14

                        The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments, of their duties and obligations...This radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people was the real American Revolution. John Adams

                        Comment

                        • fyrOM
                          Banned
                          • Feb 2010
                          • 2180

                          #57
                          Originally posted by osiris View Post
                          thanks for the correction b j. Macedonians love to expect others to be patriotic and generous
                          In my experience o have found rich Macedonians to be the least patriotic.
                          The old saying,"Much is expected of those that have much."

                          Other diasporas have done exactly that, but then Macos are different.

                          Comment

                          • Risto the Great
                            Senior Member
                            • Sep 2008
                            • 15660

                            #58
                            What a load of utter rubbish.
                            Show me Diaspora communities that have done much for their nations.
                            Are we really going to compare the Jews with anyone else? Does the USA involvement make them a unique situation? Amongst Holocausts and a few other agendas, they are certainly unique.
                            Show me one other nation.

                            Any businessman's arse-hole invests where the greatest returns are possible. They also invest where they are most confident in the business environment. Neither is immediately apparent in Macedonia.

                            The country needs to fend for itself and have a reason for sustaining itself. It cannot simply be a drain on the Diaspora. Personally, I will not invest in Macedonia whilst it is heavily on the path to ethnic federalisation.
                            Risto the Great
                            MACEDONIA:ANHEDONIA
                            "Holding my breath for the revolution."

                            Hey, I wrote a bestseller. Check it out: www.ren-shen.com

                            Comment

                            • indigen
                              Senior Member
                              • May 2009
                              • 1558

                              #59
                              I have only read parts of this thread, a few of the earlier pages of this topic, and can observe that a lot of Macedonians (especially diaspora ones) appear to carry BIG chips on their shoulders (based, IMO, on ignorance and misconceptions!) in areas relating to Macedonian identity, e.g. surnames suffixes. I really did not expect to see all I read coming from the more enlightened Macedonians but let it serve as an eye-opener of where work needs to be done in order to progress the Macedonian Cause.

                              Comment

                              • osiris
                                Senior Member
                                • Sep 2008
                                • 1969

                                #60
                                here is the village my family comes from and you will hear the dragoshets and how he refers to the villagers family names.

                                YouTube - Selo Dragos 1

                                Comment

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