19th century Athenian Albanians didn't mind Elgin taking parthenon marbles!!!

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  • TrueMacedonian
    Senior Member
    • Jan 2009
    • 3820

    #61


    Greece Offers to Forgo Claim to Ownership of Elgin Marbles, Times Reports

    By Chris Peterson - Dec 6, 2010 3:08 AM ET

    Greece offered to end the long- running dispute with Britain over the Elgin Marbles by saying it would forgo its claim in return for a long-term loan of the artefacts, once a frieze on the Parthenon, the London-based Times reported, citing Greek Culture Minister Pavlos Yeroulanos.

    The frieze was removed in 1801 by British diplomat Lord Elgin with the permission of the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, which then ruled Greece, and shipped to London after parliament agreed to buy them. Greece regards them as having been looted, the newspaper said.

    The marbles have remained in London’s British Museum ever since and the museum’s curators said in a statement that no new approach had been made, and there was no reason to suppose the Trustees would change their view that the sculptures must stay in the museum, the Times said.

    The Parthenon, a temple dedicated to the Greek goddess Athena, was completed in 438 BC.
    Slayer Of The Modern "greek" Myth!!!

    Comment

    • TrueMacedonian
      Senior Member
      • Jan 2009
      • 3820

      #62
      Greece offered to end the long- running dispute with Britain over the Elgin Marbles by saying it would forgo its claim in return for a long-term loan of the artefacts, once a frieze on the Parthenon, the London-based Times reported, citing Greek Culture Minister Pavlos Yeroulanos.
      Don't do it Britain. They are thieves and they will not return your marbles. They are bankrupt and corrupt. Cheerio ol' chaps it seems that since bankruptcy modern 'greece' has been relegated to a kitten meow from a chiuaua bark I thought this was "your identity"? What a joke.
      Slayer Of The Modern "greek" Myth!!!

      Comment

      • George S.
        Senior Member
        • Aug 2009
        • 10116

        #63
        TN greece has lost their real marbles a long time ago.THe greeks are just a bunch of sore loosers they will never get their marbles back & that's that they don't deserve to.
        Last edited by George S.; 12-16-2010, 03:08 AM. Reason: ed
        "Ido not want an uprising of people that would leave me at the first failure, I want revolution with citizens able to bear all the temptations to a prolonged struggle, what, because of the fierce political conditions, will be our guide or cattle to the slaughterhouse"
        GOTSE DELCEV

        Comment

        • TrueMacedonian
          Senior Member
          • Jan 2009
          • 3820

          #64
          David Cameron said it in 2011:

          PM dismisses suggestion by Liberal Democrat that collection of classical Greek marble sculptures should be returned to Athens


          David Cameron rejects call to return Parthenon marbles to Greece

          PM dismisses suggestion by Liberal Democrat that collection of classical Greek marble sculptures should be returned to Athens
          Hélène Mulholland, political reporter

          guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 22 June 2011 09.50 EDT

          David Cameron has rejected a call for Britain to "put right a wrong" that dates back just short of two centuries by returning the Parthenon marbles to Greece.

          Andrew George, the Liberal Democrat MP for St Ives, reopened the issue of the marble sculptures, currently in the British Museum, when he incorporated the Greek financial crisis in a Commons question.

          George told Cameron at prime minister's questions that Britain could do its bit to help Greece by returning the sculptures to Athens.

          He made the suggestion after the prime minister reiterated his belief that the European financial mechanism should be used to bail Greece out of its financial problems.

          George told Cameron: "Whilst of course we should not be making a unilateral contribution to the Greek bailout, does the prime minister not agree that we have something which would help regenerate the Greek economy and put right a 200-year wrong – and that is to give the marbles back".

          Cameron said he had no intention of allowing Britain to "lose its marbles". He told MPs: "I'm afraid I don't agree ... the short answer is that we're not going to lose them."


          And he said it again yesterday:

          NOVEMBER 22, 1951 PLASTIRAS TAKEN ILL: According to a medical bulletin issued from the prime minister’s political bureau yesterday (November 15), Prime Minister Nikolaos Plastiras was troubled by some chest pains last Thursday which forced him to remain in bed. The bulletin, signed by his doctors Professor N. Tsaboulas, K. Maroulis head of the Red […]


          Cameron rules out return of Parthenon marbles

          British Prime Minister David Cameron has ruled out the return of the so-called Elgin marbles to Greece.

          Speaking from India, where he is on an official visit, on Thursday the Tory leader turned down requests for the return of the Koh-i-noor diamond to Britain’s former colony saying he did not believe in “returnism.”

          “It is the same question with the Elgin marbles,” Cameron said, referring to the classical Greek marble sculptures currently on display at the British Museum in London.

          Greece has long campaigned for the marbles, which are part of the Parthenon temple on the Acropolis and which were removed by Lord Elgin during Ottoman rule, to be returned to their rightful place.

          “The right answer is for the British Museum and other cultural institutions to do exactly what they do, which is to link up with other institutions around the world to make sure that the things which we have and look after so well are properly shared with people around the world,” Cameron said.

          The Koh-i-noor diamond is set in the crown of the late Queen Mother and is on display with the Crown Jewels in the Tower of London. It was presented to Queen Victoria in 1850 under the Empire's rule. India has made repeated requests for its return.

          ekathimerini.com , Thursday February 21, 2013 (14:21)


          Good on you Dave
          Slayer Of The Modern "greek" Myth!!!

          Comment

          • momce
            Banned
            • Oct 2012
            • 426

            #65
            They lost their marbles a long time ago. I think they are just fine in Great Britain.

            Comment

            • Soldier of Macedon
              Senior Member
              • Sep 2008
              • 13675

              #66
              Greece still bitching about marbles that its inhabitants couldn't care less about at the time they were taken.
              https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...142211780.html

              Greece seeks return of Parthenon Marbles amid restoration project

              Greece has made the return of the Parthenon Marbles from the British Museum in London one of its top priorities. In the meantime, a restoration project is under way to undo the damage done to the building, when a British aristocrat removed the sculptures in the early 19th century.
              In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.

              Comment

              • Amphipolis
                Banned
                • Aug 2014
                • 1328

                #67
                Ο Παρθενώνας του Κώστα Γαβρά (HD) - φτιάχτηκε για να πει την ιστορία αυτού του μνημείου της Ελλάδος.Parthenon of Kostas Gavras (HD) - was made to tell the hi...


                THE CURSE OF MINERVA.

                For Elgin's fame thus grateful Pallas pleads,
                Below, his name—above, behold his deeds!
                Be ever hailed with equal honour here
                The Gothic monarch and the Pictish peer:
                Arms gave the first his right, the last had none,
                But basely stole what less barbarians won.
                So when the Lion quits his fell repast,
                Next prowls the Wolf, the filthy Jackal last:
                Flesh, limbs, and blood the former make their own,
                The last poor brute securely gnaws the bone.
                Yet still the Gods are just, and crimes are crossed:
                See here what Elgin won, and what he lost!
                Another name with his pollutes my shrine:
                Behold where Dian's beams disdain to shine!
                Some retribution still might Pallas claim,
                When Venus half avenged Minerva's shame."


                ⁠She ceased awhile, and thus I dared reply,
                To soothe the vengeance kindling in her eye:

                Comment

                • Soldier of Macedon
                  Senior Member
                  • Sep 2008
                  • 13675

                  #68
                  Originally posted by Amphipolis View Post
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbkgtsHGDJc

                  THE CURSE OF MINERVA.

                  For Elgin's fame thus grateful Pallas pleads, Below, his name—above, behold his deeds! Be ever hailed with equal honour here The Gothic monarch and the Pictish peer: Arms gave the first his right, the last had none, But basely stole what less barbarians won. So when the Lion quits his fell repast, Next prowls the Wolf, the filthy Jackal last: Flesh, limbs, and blood the former make their own, The last poor brute securely gnaws the bone. Yet still the Gods are just, and crimes are crossed: See here what Elgin won, and what he lost! Another name with his pollutes my shrine: Behold where Dian's beams disdain to shine! Some retribution still might Pallas claim, When Venus half avenged Minerva's shame." ⁠She ceased awhile, and thus I dared reply, To soothe the vengeance kindling in her eye:
                  One of the differences between Lord Elgin and the person you've quoted (Lord Byron) is that the former wanted to take Greek marbles back to the United Kingdom whereas the latter wanted to swallow Greek marbles wherever he found them.



                  Interesting character. He had sex with young boys all over Europe but was particularly fond of 'Greek' boys for some reason, he had a Latin code for "sex with a boy", he showered them with love poems and substantial amounts of money and he even died alongside his final and most prominent love interest, the 15 year old Loukas Chalandritsanos. Basically, he was a pedophile. Whilst on the topic of sick individuals, there is also your (in)famous Zorba, a fictional movie character (based on a non-fictional figure) that was, quite simply, a murderous rapist and a piece of shit that deserved nothing less than a bullet. The thing is, these are not some distant figures from antiquity or the middle ages where such despicable acts are gradually neglected as the centuries pass by, like what's happened with the Mongols or the Vikings, for example. Instead, these two maggots were around relatively recently. Yet, despite all of this, Greece and Greeks around the world celebrate the pedophile Byron and the rapist Zorba by naming dances, restaurants, clubs, etc. after these two animals. Perhaps for some, Byron's contribution in battle and Zorba's phase of "personal redemption" is enough to wash away the molestation of naive adolescents or the rape of innocent women. Is that how it is rationalised?
                  In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.

                  Comment

                  • Amphipolis
                    Banned
                    • Aug 2014
                    • 1328

                    #69
                    Byron is celebrated as a great poet. For most of you, English is your first language, I wonder if you've tried him, if he's taught at school, if his poetry still stands or faded. I once heard a poem of his, when I was zapping and coincidentally fell on a British film about his life and was very impressed. I remember the content, melancholic and existential about the meaningless of life, but of course I'm unable to locate it, read it again or share it.

                    There are many films about Byron, I have only seen the Greek one, which has some good moments, but is very sterile, intellectual and dysfunctional. He is usually presented as a tormented soul, I don't really know what the truth is about his erotic scandals, but I'm also tolerant with these things so I wouldn't mind anything.

                    Most of all Byron was also a celebrity of his time, so his dedication to the Greek cause means a lot for us. It would be like... Michael Jackson leaving his home and joining rebels in the mountains of Bosnia.

                    Comment

                    • Soldier of Macedon
                      Senior Member
                      • Sep 2008
                      • 13675

                      #70
                      Originally posted by Amphipolis View Post
                      Byron is celebrated as a great poet....I don't really know what the truth is about his erotic scandals, but I'm also tolerant with these things so I wouldn't mind anything.
                      He reveled in such scandals. That's the truth. And you would be tolerant if your underage 15 year old son was being ploughed by an animal twice his age, simply because the latter was a "great" poet? If so, your moral compass is fucked up.
                      Most of all Byron was also a celebrity of his time, so his dedication to the Greek cause means a lot for us.
                      Perhaps all of your moral compasses need a tune up.
                      It would be like... Michael Jackson leaving his home and joining rebels in the mountains of Bosnia.
                      Whether or not Michael Jackson is guilty, he didn't gloat about it. The difference between my people and yours is that if any of the Macedonian revolutionaries were known to be pedophiles they would've been assassinated by the organisation, irrespective of their military prowess. We certainly wouldn't glorify them as heroes.
                      In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a lion and a Macedonian.

                      Comment

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