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Old 02-04-2018, 08:20 AM   #21
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"In this case I would prefer to see in this military colony of Cyprus a mixture of Goths and Albanians. The Goth element, doubtless very small, was early absorbed by the natives, while the Albanians, more numerous, persisted forming a race apart until the sixteenth century, the time of their disappearance from Cyprus."

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https://books.google.ca/books?id=DHx...banais&f=false
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Old 04-04-2018, 07:15 AM   #22
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There is no accurate information as to the number of Armenians living in Cyprus during the Byzantine Era. Although during the early Frankish Era there were tens of thousands of Armenians living in Cyprus (mainly in Nicosia and Famagusta - where in the latter they numbered around 1,500 souls in 1360), by the late Frankish Era and certainly during the Venetian Era, the number of Armenians in Cyprus dwindled - for a number of reasons: this was due to the tyrannical rule of the Venetian administration, combined with the adverse natural conditions (which affected all Cypriots), as well as the Hellenisation of the various minorities of the island. In fact, the 1572 survey of population and property of Nicosia after the Ottoman conquest, under beylerbey Sinan Pasha, recorded 90-95 local Armenians in Nicosia, out of about 1,100 inhabitants - all with completely Hellenised names.
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Old 05-19-2018, 04:20 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlin View Post
Modern Greek identity in Cyprus developed and was created in the same way and manner it developed in mainland Greece or Crete.

I have never found any drastic change in the populace of Crete, regarding historical events. It is generally believed that Cretans can make a big claim to ancient Greece.
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Old 05-19-2018, 09:34 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tchaiku View Post
I have never found any drastic change in the populace of Crete, regarding historical events. It is generally believed that Cretans can make a big claim to ancient Greece.
0) The Making of the Cretan Landscape - By Oliver Rackham, Jennifer Moody

https://books.google.ca/books?id=k4d...0Crete&f=false

- Crete might seem to have escaped through being an island, but place-names and surnames show that some Slavs and Albanians settled here.
- The medieval Venetians were among the chief colonisers of Crete: they settled their own merchants and nobles, introduced slaves and prisoners-of-war. African slaves continued to be imported until 1859.
- Cretans are descended, to varying degrees, from Albanians, Argives, Armenians, Bulgars, Dorians, Eteocretans, French, Germans, Hebrews, Minoans, Negroes, Pelasgians, Romans, Saracens, Serbs, Spaniards, Spartans, Tartars, Turks, Venetians and Vlachs.

1) The Crusades from the Perspective of Byzantium and the Muslim World, edited by Angeliki E. Laiou, Roy P. Mottahedeh.

Page 204, footnote 42: Some 2,000 Armenians were settled in Crete in 1363.

2) The Edinburgh History of the Greeks, c. 500 to 1500, by Florin Curta -> Page 288 and Page 289.

https://books.google.ca/books?id=aKE...0crete&f=false

- 'Kapheroi, Thrakesians, Armenians, and others from different places and cities' settled in Peloponnesos in the early ninth century, while Armenians 'and other rabble' came to Crete in the aftermath of the island's conquest in 961.

3) JOURNAL ARTICLE

From Capital to Colony: Five New Inscriptions from Roman Crete
M. W. Baldwin Bowsky
The Annual of the British School at Athens
Vol. 101 (2006), pp. 385-426

https://www.jstor.org/stable/3007326...n_tab_contents

This article present and contextualises five new inscriptions from central Crete: one from the hinterland of Gortyn, two from Knossos, and two more in all likelihood from Knossos. Internal geographical mobility from Gortyn to Knossos is illustrated by a Greek inscription from the hinterland of Gortyn. The Knossian inscriptions add new evidence for the local affairs of the Roman colony. A funerary or honorary inscription and two religious dedications - all three in Latin - give rise to new points concerning the well-attested link between Knossos and Campania. The colony's population included people, many of Campanian origin, who were already established in Crete, as well as families displaced from southern Italy in the great post-Actium settlement.

4) After the 1204 AD sack of Constantinople, the island of Crete was offered first to Count Boniface of Monferrat, the leader of the Crusade. Unable to stamp his authority on the large island he sold it to the Venetians for 1000 silver pieces. Formal possession was taken by the Republic of Venice on 12th August 1204 AD, and by 1212 they had consolidated their authority, ousting the initially successful usurpation of the Genovese; they then began a systematic colonization by settling Venetian nobles and soldiery.

http://www.destinationcrete.gr/en/mesaionas/venetians

5) Emirate of Crete

The Emirate of Crete (called Iqritish or Iqritiya in Arabic) was a Muslim state that existed on the Mediterranean island of Crete from the late 820s to the Byzantine reconquest of the island in 961. Although the emirate recognized the suzerainty of the Abbasid Caliphate and maintained close ties with Tulunid Egypt, it was de facto independent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emirate_of_Crete

It is unclear what happened to the island's Christians after the Muslim conquest; the traditional view is that most were either converted or expelled. There is evidence from Muslim sources, however, for the continued survival of Christians on Crete, as a subject class, as in other Muslim conquests, although according to the same sources the Muslims, whether descendants of the Andalusians, more recent migrants, or converts (or any combination of these) formed the majority.

6) In the 18th century Muslim Lazes settled in Cyprus and Crete, transferring their cultural influence.

https://www.ithesis.gr/politikh/oi-p...in-ellada-mas/

7) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gX7Q5chnh0



"NOT ALL AFRO-TURKS ARE DESCENDANTS OF SLAVES. SOME ARE DESCENDANTS OF GREEK SPEAKING BLACK MUSLIMS FROM CRETE."

8) The Venetians moved Arvanites to Crete, where they remained until 1669, when Crete finally fell to the Turks.

Last edited by Carlin15; 05-19-2018 at 11:42 AM.
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Old 05-19-2018, 02:09 PM   #25
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Yeah I have seen most of those before. I said drastic in purpose, couple of thousands settlers does not do much.

I didnt expect your story about Black people though. That was quite surprising.
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Old 06-23-2018, 04:52 PM   #26
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After the purchase of Cyprus by titular Frankish King of Jerusalem Guy de Lusignan in 1192, in his attempt to establish a western-type feudal kingdom, the latter sent emissaries to Europe, Cilicia and the Levant, resulting in a massive immigration of Armenians and other peoples from Western Europe, Cilicia and the Levant (mainly Franks, Latins and Maronites, as well as Copts, Ethiopians, Georgians, Jacobites, Jews, Melkites, Nestorians and others).
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hist...ians_in_Cyprus
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Old 07-12-2018, 11:14 AM   #27
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Cyprus -
But after the Frankish settlement, men 'began to learn French, and barbarized their Greek into what it is to-day', says Machaeras in the fifteenth century, 'and we write French and Greek so that in the world there is no one who can say what langauge we use'.

https://books.google.com/books?id=Sn...%20the&f=false

Last edited by tchaiku; 07-13-2018 at 02:48 AM.
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Old 07-12-2018, 08:50 PM   #28
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Venice was a hub of transportation of slaves to Tuscany and Catalonia (many were Slavs). From the 12th century, sugar plantations in Cyprus and Sicily were fuelled by slave labour. During the 15th century, the Portuguese transported over 150,000 slaves to their possessions and Spain issued vast allocations of slaves to settlers in Mexico.

(We may never know how many slaves ended up being transported to Cyprus.)
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Old 07-13-2018, 07:29 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlin15 View Post
- "Martin Kruzius, (1526-1607), an author who was well familiar with Greek, states that the following 5 languages were spoken in Cyprus: Greek, Chaldean, Armenian, Albanian and Italian. Another writer, who lived in 1537-1590, Stephen Lusignan, says that the following 12 languages were spoken in Cyprus, during his day: Latin, Italian, Greek, Armenian, Coptic, Jacobine, Maronine, Assyrian, Indian, Georgian, Albanian and Arabian. (See "Description de toute l'isle de Cypre et des roys ..."
''... the tongues of every nation under heaven are heard and read and taught; they are all taught in special schools.''

But after the Frankish settlement, men ''began to learn French, and barbarized their Greek into what it is to-day'', says Machaeras in the fifteenth century, ''and we write French and Greek so that in the world there is no one who can say what language we use''.
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Old 07-15-2018, 12:40 AM   #30
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Cyprus during Middle Ages ---

There are no Byzantine churches which survive from this period; thousands of people were killed, and many cities – such as Salamis – were destroyed and never rebuilt. Byzantine rule was restored in 965, when Emperor Nikephoros II Phokas scored decisive victories on land and sea.
Source (unfortunately no longer available):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyprus...eb2.loc.gov-56

Last edited by tchaiku; 07-15-2018 at 12:44 AM.
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