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Old 05-16-2018, 06:39 AM   #1
liaemars
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Default The Turkish/Serbian/Bulgarian soldier

I accidentally came across this image today.
An image that perfectly illustrates what Macedonians mean when we say we were forced into participating in fratricidal wars against each other.
I don't know if this was posted before,the mods can delete this thread if it was.
It's an image of a grave of a certain Petko Liskovski (1882-1970) who,as the inscription suggests, served as a Turkish soldier from 1910 to 1912, then as a Serbian soldier from 1914 to 1915, and eventually as a Bulgarian soldier from 1916 to 1918.
This is one of many examples of how Macedonians were used instead of the native soldiers whenever a country would occupy Macedonia (my own great-grandfather served first as a Bulgarian soldier and later when Vardarska Macedonia was given to Serbia after the Balkan wars as a Serbian soldier too, because the new authorities didn't recognize his previous army service).
Considering the time period when Petko served as a soldier (the period of the 2 Balkan wars and WWI) I can conclude that without a doubt he was dispatched in combat and fought fellow Macedonians dispatched by the other side,since drafting Macedonians according to needs was a common thing back then.
This is the tragic story of the Macedonians in a nutshell - forcefully fighting for other interests instead of their own...
Contacts: http://www.macedoniantruth.org/forum/member.php?u=2397

Last edited by liaemars; 05-20-2018 at 03:07 AM.
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Old 05-16-2018, 08:45 AM   #2
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Sounds interesting liaemers, welcome to the forum by the way. Could you post the image here?
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Old 05-16-2018, 06:14 PM   #3
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This is the grave of Petko Liskovski

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Old 05-16-2018, 06:33 PM   #4
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Here loose translation from Macedonian about Petko Liskovski


Which army arrived recruited him to be their soldier. They changed his uniform and surname. From Liskovski he became Liskovic then Liskov. He suffered eight years whilst fighting for the Turks, Serbs and Bulgarians on the fronts of the Balkan Wars and the First World War. You even saw yourself with your brother through the gun's rifle, both mobilized in two armies.

Thus relatives describe the life of the former soldier-sufferer from Macedonia, Petko Liskovski, who from 1910 to 1918 was forced to fight in three foreign armies, which were sometimes hostile. An indisputable proof of this horror, say the relatives, is the tombstone of Liskovski at the church "St. Spas" in the village of Dobrushevo, Bitola. Through him, relatives wanted to depict one of the bloodiest periods of Macedonian history in the shortest possible way. At the tomb they wrote: "Here rests Petko Likovski, a Turkish soldier from 1910 to 1912, a Serbian soldier from 1914 to 1915, and a Bulgarian soldier from 1916 to 1918." Besides each date, they posted photographs of Liskovski from the time he was a Turkish, Serbian and Bulgarian soldier.

- There were five sons. The tomb is made according to their idea. They found the potraits and added them on the monument. The idea was to remain as evidence for the history of Macedonia, about how our people were mobilized in foreign armies. From the village there were other soldiers who changed several military uniforms, but their children did not take care to put pictures on the graves and to keep it remembered - said Metodija Talevski, nephew of the son of the late Likovski.

He changed sides due to pressure

We were fortunate during our visit to Dobrushevo to catch the descendants of Liskovski, his grandson Metodija and his family. They live in Sweden, but they came for a holiday in their native village this summer to see their relatives and to light a candle for the dead. While sitting under the big mulberry tree, which was planted by Petko in the yard, grandson Metodija flooded with family photos of his grandfather. Some of the soldier photographs where tear-shaped chests, with a rifle in his hands and a pistol in his belt. Others with a Serbian cap, another with a Bulgarian cap, there were wedding photographs, others with the children.

- It's a pity that nobody is interested in hearing the story of him when my father was alive. He knew everything, and we remember some of his stories. My grandfather switched several armies because he was forced, not because he wanted to. The people had to listen, there were threats from the armies, pressures. He changed several uniforms, but not the patriotic feeling. He loved Macedonia - tells Metodija. Petko was first recruited by the Turks and fought on their side in the First Balkan War in 1912. After Allied forces defeated Turkey, and it lost its territories in the Balkans, He returned home. After two years the First World War began, and since he lived in Vardar Macedonia, which after the Balkan wars fell under Serbian rule, he was mobilized as part of the Serbian troops. He fought under the Serbian bailout against the Bulgarian army for a year. Then he crossed over to the side of the Bulgarians, and it is not excluded that he was captured by them, and then recruited into their troops.

The brother saw him through the gun's gun

Listening to the life story of Lisovski, the events of the novels of the Macedonian writer Petre M Andreevski revived before our eyes. Andreevski, in which he described the fratricidal war between the Macedonians forcibly mobilized in opposing armies. The villagers say that Petko and one of his brothers fought on the same front, but on different sides.

- It is recounted that in the First World War as he fought for the Serbian army, his brother was mobilized by the Bulgarians. They met at the battlefield, one in one ditch, the other in another, seen through the gun's gun. Then one of them cried out, "Brother, are you alive at all?" Although he had not visited his home for months, to comfort him, he replied, "Everybody is fine!" Then his brother was locked in a camp in the Austro- Hungary, where he died - the residents from Dobrushevo tell us.

Petko was lucky and survived the wars. But he felt the consequences of the fighting for the rest of his life. Especially he complained of pain in his legs because he was barely saved from being frozen several times. He lived for 88 years, received grandchildren, married and married, great grandchildren.

And the prisoners recruited them as their own

We found the tomb of Liskovski and several other military cemeteries in the Bitola region thanks to the Bitola Institute and Museum and the director Liljana Hristova. With us, eminent historians Aleksandar Litovski and Vlado Temelkovski-Lavčan traveled. They say that the tomb in Dobrusevo is the shortest that can, in a few words, reflect the Macedonian tragic history.


- It is unique in the world for several years the same person to fight in three armies, which were mostly opposed to each other and hostile. It often happened that the same person was going to fight with Bulgarians and Serbs, who recruited him as well. There are examples in the documentation that some have captured him, only changed his Bulgarian-Serbian hat, and fought for the Serbs. Some soldier will miss him with a military service, and others will recruit him. It was a general chaos and everyone considered the Macedonians, which is the worst, for their own people, Serbs for Serbs, Bulgarians for Bulgarians - says Litovski. We continued with a tour of other military cemeteries in Skochivir, Zivojno, Bach, Dobroveni. Some are running as Serbian, others as Bulgarian. But historians say most of the buried soldiers are Macedonians. In Bitola, one of the biggest battles in the First World War took place, and that was the famous battle of the Black River and Kaimakchalan bandages. On the band, a plaque for Vladimir Chopov, the grandson of Goce Delchev, who was killed there in the battle in 1918, was also placed.


To count the Macedonian victims

- There were Macedonians, especially during the breakthrough of the Macedonian Front, up to Kajmakchalan, where the bloodiest battles were waged. Serbs could not, did not know these places, they had to have ours in their army. Macedonians helped to break the front. Also in the Battle of Kumanovo, which led to the First Balkan War, many Macedonians took part, but they are shown with the extension “ic” at the end of their surnames, "says Temelkovski.

Serbs want to restore a postals monument

Macedonia has not yet counted its victims on the Balkan fronts, while in the meantime the neighboring countries have renewed and maintained part of the military cemetery on our territory. The latest is that the Postmaster Association of Serbia is requesting to renew the postman's monument in Dobroveni village. It is a monument dedicated to all soldiers who carried letters in the First World War on the side of the Serbian army.

The monument was painted with the international sign of the postmen in the form of a trumpet.
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