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Old 04-21-2020, 09:42 AM   #211
Carlin15
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"Many other Ragusans studied elsewhere in Italy and even in Paris, and their contribution to Dubrovnik’s culture was certainly quite substantial.

Some of these people became prominent not only in Dubrovnik but in the Western world as well. Three among them deserve special mention: Ivan Stojković, Ivan Gazul, and Benko Kotruljević. All were born about 1400. Ivan Stojković (Johannes de Staiis), son of a poor shoemaker, became a Dominican friar and was sent on a government scholarship to Paris to study at the Sorbonne. His performance was excellent, and he managed to ascend rapidly in the ecclesiastical ranks. Having become first an important figure at the papal court at Rome, he later played one of the leading roles in the Basle Council and also greatly helped the Ragusans in obtaining the concession for navigation to Egypt and Syria (see Chapter II).

As envoy of the Basle Council, Stojković traveled to Constantinople to seek the union of the Eastern and the Western churches. He was certainly picked for this job because of his knowledge of the Slavic language and of the Balkan situation. Stojković profited by his two-year stay in Constantinople by having theological and classical Greek works copied for him which he carried back to Basle. In Constantinople, Stojković had discussions with Patriarch Joseph II, a Bulgarian by origin, with whom he spoke Slavic. The Ragusan government profited by Stojković’s stay in the Byzantine capital and asked him to intervene with Emperor John VIII to obtain commercial privileges for Dubrovnik."

- Dubrovnik in the 14th and 15th centuries: A City Between East and West, By Bariša Krekić

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Old 05-24-2020, 04:13 PM   #212
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Originally Posted by tchaiku View Post
Modern Greek legends about ancient Greeks.

Here’s what the villagers near Delphi thought, for instance (“page 39”):

"The Mylords (= English aristocrats on the Grand Tour) are no Christians: nobody has ever seen them make the sign of the cross. They are descended from the old pagans, the Adelphians, who kept their treasure in a fortress called Adelphi “Brothers”, named after the two brother princes who had built it. When the Virgin Mary and Christ came to this land and all the people around became Christians, the Adelphians thought it best if they left; and they left for the West and took all their riches with them. The Mylords are their descendants, and that’s why they come now on pilgrimage to these stones."

FOKIDA (Delphi), 19th c.
Source: HN Ulrichs, Reisen und Forschungen, p. 123 et seq.

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The name of the Greeks still lives on the shepherds around the temple of Apollo in Vassa. With this name they characterize everything that is believed to be heroic and gigantic. For themselves, they are anything but brave enough to be the heirs of the glory of the old inhabitants. The simplistic thinking of these shepherds considers the Greek ancestors of the Franks, foreign craftsmen who once held this place. This explains why Europeans travel to these places and pay so much attention to what is left of them.


ARKADIA, 19th c.
Source: O.M. von Stackelberg, Der Apollotempel zu Bassae in Arkadien, 1826, p. 14.
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Old 09-10-2020, 12:26 AM   #213
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- The very first Roman coin was minted in bronze in 326 BCE, and had a single inscription in Greek rather than Latin - PΩMAIΩN (ROMAION).

- Nova Roma (Νέα Ῥώμη) was the alternative name for Constantinople since the city became the capital of the Roman Empire. After the Council of Chalcedon the name became a part of the Patriarchal title (Archbishop of Constantinople, New Rome, and Ecumenical Patriarch). Medieval Roman capital was also the City of many names. The Vikings called it Miklagarđr (Big City), in Arabic it was called Rūmiyyat al-Kubra (Great City of the Romans), in Persian it was Takht-e Rum (Throne of the Romans), and the Slavs called it Tsargrad (City of the Caesar).

- Both capitals of the Roman state, the ancient & the medieval one, were known as the City on the seven hills. The significance of 7 comes from the Septimontium, an ancient pre-urban festival celebrated by montani, residents of the 7 (sept-) hill communities that would became Rome.

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