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Old 10-16-2019, 10:40 PM   #161
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"... it has been suggested by competent scholars that at the time of the founding of the Bulgarian state in 1878, less than 50% of the new state's population may have been Bulgarian. Within a few decades this percentage rose to form an unchallengeable majority, partly, at least, through the assimilation of non-Bulgarian elements in the population. [Stefan Troebst, 'Nationale Minderheiten'. in Klaus - Detlev Grothusen (cd.). Sudosteurope-Handbuch. Band VI: Bulgarien (Gottingen. 1990).]"

-- NATIONALITY IN THE BALKANS: THE CASE OF THE MACEDONIANS, by F. A. K. Yasamee (Balkans: A Mirror of the New World Order, Istanbul: EREN, 1995; pp. 121-132)
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Old 10-19-2019, 06:18 PM   #162
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1) ПИСМО ОД ЕГЕЈСКА МАКЕДОНИЈА ОД 1862: Нашите луѓе овде не знаат бугарски, туку нашиот македонски јазик

URL:
https://denesen.mk/pismo-od-egejska-...edonski-jazik/

Ќе ти пишувам почесто, ама не знам по бугарски, нашите луѓе овде не знаат бугарски, пишува во писмо од Ениџе Вардар на 10 септември 1862 година.

Јазикот на Македонците во Егејска или Беломорска Македонија не бил бугарскиот, туку македонскиот или како што стои во оригиналот „Мачедонски език“.

Под фотографија од албумот „Сведоштва за постоење на македонската национална свест“, објавена на Фејсбук, стои назнака дека писмото е од 10 септември 1862 година.




2) URL:
https://denesen.mk/foto-vashington-t...li-po-poteklo/

(фото) ВАШИНГТОН ТАЈМС ВО 1903 ОД СОФИЈА: Близу половина од населението во Бугарија се Македонци по род или по потекло


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Old 10-25-2019, 12:32 AM   #163
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The 'Second Bulgarian Empire.' Its Origin and History to 1204
R. Wolff


1) When, after more than a century, the fourth uprising did take place in 1186, it was under the auspices of two local chieftains, Peter and Asen, whom all the sources, Byzantine and western, agree in calling Vlachs, and who lived in the Balkan mountains. The most elaborate theories have been resorted to by Bulgarian historians to prove that the word 'Vlach' had by 1185 come to mean a 'Bulgar from the northwest part of the country.' They explain this phenomenon as the result of a conspiracy of silence on the part of Byzantine writers, who, they argue, were trying to avoid the use of the word 'Bulgar' and to substitute 'Vlach.' In fact, however, it can be demonstrated that Byzantine writers use the word 'Bulgar' quite freely when they are talking about Bulgars, and use 'Vlach' only to refer to Vlachs. It has long been realized that any other interpretation involves the twisting of the sources until they bear no relationship to the ascertainable facts about the origin and development of the ‘second Bulgarian Empire.’

2) Not long thereafter, one of Asen's captives, a priest, who spoke the Vlach language, begged for his freedom, and was refused, Asen saying with a grim pun (a pun, it is true, only in Greek, and we are told that they were speaking Vlach) that he intended not to let him go but to kill him. The priest, weeping, told Asen that God would show no future mercy to a man who had refused to heed the request of a poor suppliant. And indeed Asen was shortly thereafter killed by Ivanko, a Vlach, who was having an affair with Asen's wife's sister. Angered at the scandal, Asen had begun by threatening his wife, but soon turned his anger against Ivanko, whom he sent for late at night, refusing to postpone the interview. Taking council with his friends, Ivanko concealed a sword under his cloak for use only if Asen drew first. Asen reached for his sword immediately, and Ivanko struck. It was said that the captive sebastocrator Isaac had been at the root of the plot, and that he had promised Ivanko his own daughter in marriage. But even before the killing of Asen, Isaac had died in his chains. Ivanko's friends agreed that he would make a better ruler than the tyrannical Asen; and, seizing Tirnovo, Ivanko prepared to hold out against Asen's brothers Peter and Ioannitsa. ... He requested Byzantine aid, offering to hand over Tirnovo, Vlach capital and the key to their Balkan defenses.

3) It was at this juncture, in 1198 or 1199, that local Vlach chieftains other than the family of the Asen brothers began to set up independent principalities. Chrysos (Dobromir Chrysos), a Vlach, had at first not joined in the original insurrection of Peter and Asen, but had helped the Byzantines against them with a force of 500 men. Later he was captured, and drawn over to the side of his own people, disappointing Alexius by setting himself up as local ruler at Strumnitsa. The Emperor undertook one fruitless expedition against him, and some time later set out on a second, Chrysos having by this time taken possession of the virtually impregnable fortress of Prosakon (Prosek) on a cliff jutting out into the Vardar, and almost surrounded by water. Here Alexius foolishly undertook siege operations, which, however, nearly succeeded. Had it not been for a shortage of battering rams, Prosakon might have fallen, and much later trouble saved.

Last edited by Carlin15; 10-25-2019 at 12:48 AM.
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