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Old 04-06-2020, 06:58 AM   #491
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- In the 18th century, the Mijaks had an armed conflict with the Islamized Mijak population regarding pasture lands.
- In the first half of the 19th century, a notable part of the Mijak population was Albanized.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mijaks
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Old 04-16-2020, 10:45 PM   #492
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From Constantine Papanache's "Macedonia" newspaper, year 1955. Issue number 9, page 6:


It's a very small sample size but it is curious that in the Sardinian language the word for 'language' is limba, while the word for 'water' is abba.

These could be natural variations caused by phonetic laws; it doesn't mean that the Vlachs are related to the Sardinians. But, it is very surprising and unexpected.

URLs:
https://books.google.ca/books?id=ReG...page&q&f=false
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinian_language
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Old 04-23-2020, 11:22 PM   #493
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The testimony comes from a French source (Perrot), from 1855. Let's see what was the "ethnic composition" of Prishtina, Kosovo according to Perrot.




As we can plainly see, the population of Prishtina was: "12,000, of which two-thirds are Albanians and the rest are Greeks."

Let's break it down and analyze this in more detail. Branislav Nushich, in 1902, talks about the diverse ethnic composition of Prishtina:

"Prishtina is a compact town; houses do not have spacious courtyards and gardens... When Prishtina was declared the headquarters of the Vilayet, it barely counted 1800 houses and now it stands at 3760 houses. Of these, 3170 houses are Turks and Albanians; 420 houses of Serbs, and there are at least 100 houses of Gypsies, about 50 Jewish houses, 10 to 15 houses of Armani (Vlachs) and a little bit of Circassians. If we were count roughly five souls per household then the population proportions would be: 15850 Turks and Albanians; 2100 Serbs; 500 Gypsies; 250 Jews and several dozen Armani (Vlachs) and some Circassians, which would total 18,800 souls. Although the official Turkish statistics show this number, however, this is exaggerated. Prishtina does not have more than 12,000 inhabitants, because many people were forced out of the Vilayet and a lot of houses were left empty. A large number of people are moving out into livlier trade places, as well as emigrating to Serbia."

In another Serbian source/publication below we see that Jukich states that Prishtina has about 12,000 residents of which Serbs make up one-third of the population (including Vlachs in this number). According to the first official Yugoslav census in 1921, Prishtina had 14,338 inhabitants of which Serbs (4325), including 'other Slavs' (19) and Vlachs (17) formed roughly one-third (Serbian-speaking Orthodox Gypsies were apparently counted as 'Serbs' as well). Two-thirds were made up of people declaring themselves as Turks (7115) and Albanians (1421).

Links/Sources for the above:
https://www.facebook.com/notes/pri%C...7808190952831/
https://books.google.ca/books?id=NR4...%D0%B8&f=false

So, Perrot - in 1855 - got the number of Prishtina residents right (!) but his "ethnic Greeks" were Serbs (Slavs) who were Orthodox or Greek Christians. It is actually possible that Greek was used at this time in the Orthodox churches in Prishtina, while some merchants/traders utilized Greek as the language of commerce.

The point and question is this:

If educated westerners were incorrectly classifying population groups as 'Greek' as late as 1855, what hope do we have of knowing or accepting with certainty many other similar reports from Macedonia, Epirus, Thessaly, Peloponnese, Crete?

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Old 04-26-2020, 06:54 PM   #494
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Assertion of Zonaras: in the great migrations, the ancient Albanians were the same as the Alani who were driven from the Caucasus to Europe by the Tatars in the thirteenth century.

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Old 04-30-2020, 10:51 AM   #495
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Old 05-14-2020, 10:14 PM   #496
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Old 05-14-2020, 10:54 PM   #497
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Old Today, 11:56 AM   #498
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According to the testimonies divulged in the book "Bulgarians of Morava, Historical and ethnographic sketches" by the Bulgarian Gavriil Zanetov, regions of central, eastern and south-eastern Serbia were teeming with Romanians, Bulgarians, and settlers who arrived to some of these parts from Macedonia as well as from other nearby areas. There was apparently an "early migration" of Macedonians in northern Bulgaria, likely after the coming of the Ottoman Empire to the Balkans.

Here are some examples.

1) "At the beginning of the 19th century in Shumadija, Morava and the end of the Danube the population was very sparse. In previous centuries, there was talk of a compact population in these parts, which probably emigrated to the north, without preserving memories of it. As early as the beginning of the 18th century we found the area east of the Morava, along the Mlava, Peka, Porechka rivers and the Negotin region - inhabited by Vlachs from Banat and Wallachia. Along the Morava there are traces of immigrants from Vidin, Skopje, Herzegovina and elsewhere, from the same time. The people ... around Zajechar and several Serbian villages around Negotin have been resettled since the same time, if not earlier. The settlement of the Turks in the Peninsula forced the population to move from the south to the north. One of the earliest migrations was that of the Macedonians in northern Bulgaria, where they settled in the so-called "Arnaut" villages. In the 18th century, Vlachs from the town of Moscopole were scattered north through Bulgaria."

2) "A traveler through Serbia in 1829 said that there were a large number of Bulgarians and Vlachs among the Serbs. "The number of Bulgarians and Vlachs settled in Serbia is growing every day and is increasing with new immigrants." Prince Milosh then expressed that Serbia already had twice as many inhabitants as it had ten years earlier."

3) "The population along the Danube and the Sava is mixed, in every village there are migrants from different countries. In the south-eastern parts ... there is a population in the villages of Sremchitsi from Elashnitsa to Nis from the Bitola village of Buf ... In Pozharevac area near the Danube there are many migrants from Macedonia - Kichevo region, Tetovo region and from Bulgaria - from Vidin from Znepole."

4) "The Shumadijans call the immigrants from the east Bulgarians. They call the settlers from Macedonia - even when they are Slavs - Tsintsari or Shijatsi".


PS: From Wikipedia.

"The Aromanians, known as Tsintsari (Цинцари), migrated to Serbia in the 18th and early 19th centuries. They most often were bilingual in Greek, and were often called "Greeks" (Grci). They were influential in the forming of Serbian statehood, having contributed with rebel fighters, merchants, and educated people. Many Greek-Aromanians (Грко-Цинцари) came to Serbia with Alija Gušanac as krdžalije (mercenaries) and did later join the Serbian Revolution (1804–17). Some of the notable rebels include Konda Bimbaša and Papazogli. Among the notable people of Aromanian descent are playwright Jovan Sterija Popović (1806–1856), novelist Branislav (real name: Alkibiad) Nušić (1864–1938), and politician Vladan (real name: Ipokrat) Đorđević (1844–1930)."

(Ipokrat "Vladan" Đorđević was of partial descent from Macedonia, while Alkibiad "Branislav" Nušić's father's family had its roots in the village of Magarevo, Macedonia.)

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