View Single Post
Old 10-10-2015, 11:32 PM   #13
Karposh
Member
 
Karposh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 642
Karposh has much to be proud ofKarposh has much to be proud ofKarposh has much to be proud ofKarposh has much to be proud ofKarposh has much to be proud ofKarposh has much to be proud ofKarposh has much to be proud ofKarposh has much to be proud ofKarposh has much to be proud of
Default Alexander's Generals

I came across an interesting document recently attributed to Marcus Junianus Justinus in which he describes Alexander’s generals in such glowing terms and in such a gushing sense of awe that I just had to share a part of it with everyone on this forum. What caught my eye in particular was Justin’s description of them as belonging to a “single nation”. Reading this it’s hard to overlook the repeated theme in the writings of all these historians, from Justin to Arrian, Diodorus, Plutarch, Quintus Curtius and others where the Macedonians are described as belonging to a unique “nation”, “race” and “ethnicity”.

Here it is:

“Alexander’s generals were worthy to aspire to his throne, for they possessed such courage and inspired such respect that it would be easy to take them all for kings. Such was the beauty of their forms, the greatness of their stature and the extent of their wisdom that if one did not know them one might believe that they had been chosen, not from a single nation but from all the universe. Never before had Macedonia or any other country seen the blossoming of so many illustrious men. First Philip, and then Alexander, had selected them with such care that they seemed to have sought out not companions in war so much as successors to their power. Who then could wonder that with such servants Alexander conquered the world, given that the Macedonian army was led not by so many chiefs but by so many kings? They would have been without peers if they had not fallen to fighting among themselves, and the province of Macedonia would have had many Alexanders had fortune-inspiring rivalry in courage among them-not armed them for their mutual ruin”.

Marcus Junianus Justinus
Epitome of the Philippic History,
XIII.1.10-15; 2.1-14,
3rd Century AD

Also, I just want to add my two cents regarding keeping the language being posted at a respectable level. I have to agree with Soldier of Macedon in this case. It doesn't help our cause to mimic the abuse that some Greeks often dish out at us.
Karposh is offline   Reply With Quote