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Old 08-18-2010, 09:12 PM   #23
Pelister
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R. A Gallop was the third secretary of the British foriegn office at Belgrade. In 1926 he visited Macedonia for a week in order to get a better picture of the state of things on the ground, and discovered that the people "call themselves 'Makedonci'". In his report he uses the Macedonian term 'Makedonci' rather than its English equivalent - Macedonian.

There is no doubt in his mind as to what term they used to describe themselves.

Quote:
"The Macedonian Slavs considered and called themselves 'Makedonci'"
Cited in Andrew Rossos, The British Foreign Office and Macedonian National Identity, 1918 - 1941

Source: British National Archives, FO 371/11337, Enclosure, 23 April, 1926

nb: I have not had the chance check this source, but of the other sources provided by Rossos that I have checked - I can say that they are accurate.

Here is something interesting. Even though the British intelligence services had known about the existence of the Macedonians, by their own admission, for many decades the British policy makers insisted on a policy of 'Don't name them' and 'Don't count them'. The British were able to block Macedonian grievances at the League of Nations, to shut them down, and shut them out, they were able to make sure that the voice of the Macedonians was never 'aired' in public, or even mentioned by that name.

The British 'slighting' of the Macedonians developed into a blocking operation played out on an international level.

Here is an insight into that policy operation.

C.H Bateman of the British foriegn office noted that:

Quote:
"Just because the Slavs of Macedonia call themselves Macedonians 'there was no reason why we or you should consent to give them a name which coincides with a piece of territory (of the same name)...which has not for a thousand years been an autonomou entity...
Source: FO 371/12856, 'Sargent (London) to Sperling, 22 October, 1928

NB: The land is called 'Macedonia', and the people call themselves 'Macedonians', but I'm assuming that because it has not established itself into a political organization that is based on the Western model - British policy makers, 'slighted' it.

Last edited by Pelister; 08-18-2010 at 09:15 PM.
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