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Old 02-14-2011, 08:29 PM   #1
TrueMacedonian
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Default Common Macedonian Soldier Proud NOT To Be Greek




Have not finished reading this book, just got it recently. Will post more from it in due time.
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Old 02-14-2011, 08:56 PM   #2
lavce pelagonski
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I need to get this book.
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Стравот на Атина од овој Македонец одел до таму што го нарекле Страшниот Чакаларов гркоубиец и крвожеден комитаџија.

Ако знам дека тука тече една капка грчка крв, јас сега би ја отсекол целата рака и би ја фрлил в море. Васил Чакаларов
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Old 02-15-2011, 04:34 AM   #3
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Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great conquered lands from Greece, Egypt, and Iraq to Iran, Afghanistan, and India, all before his death at the age of thirty two. In this new narrative biography, learn how this relentless and driven man was able to win against all odds and shape the world in which we still live today.

Reviews:

Wall Street Journal:
"Here, in vivid and exciting detail, are all the familiar highlights of Alexander's career: the battles, the tempestuous relationships, the dazzling ambitions, the mysterious death in Babylon. Mr. Freeman's ambition, he tells us in his introduction, was 'to write a biography of Alexander that is first and foremost a story.' It is one he splendidly fulfills."

Boston Globe:
"Freeman does not hero worship Alexander, and does not paper over his subject’s many faults. At times, Alexander can seem like an almost mythic figure, but, as Freeman shows, he was all too human."

Kirkus Reviews:
"Historian Freeman (Classics/Luther Coll.; Julius Caesar, 2008, etc.) presents an accessible biography of the young Macedonian king.

The author's love for his subject infuses this footnote-free narrative with an unfussy breeziness, and readers are sure to come away from Alexander's story with an essential grasp of the details and understanding of his character.

Freeman portrays the Macedonian people as having a shared language and culture distinct from Greek—to the Greeks' scorn but Macedonians' pride. Alexander's father was the "genius" on whom his son was able to establish his later empire, and the author wisely devotes some initial pages to Philips's masterly diplomacy, radical restructuring of his army and training of engineers. From his father, Alexander learned the importance of building alliances in the Greek world by marriage and immersion in the local religionslexander was born into the royal family of Macedonia, the kingdom that would soon rule over Greece. Tutored as a boy by Aristotle, Alexander had an inquisitive mind that would serve him well when he faced formidable obstacles during his military campaigns. Shortly after taking command of the army, he launched . Conceived from his union with the strange, snake-loving daughter of the kingdom of Epirus, Olympias, Alexander was his father's pride—winning the magnificent but unmanageable horse Bucephalus out of cunning and bravery—as well as his scourge, demonstrating a troubling hubris. However, "the bull [was] ready for slaughter," as the oracle at Delphi proclaimed to the unknowing Philip, and when he was felled by a dagger, Alexander, at age 20, was swift to consolidate his own power. He won the loyalty of his troops, thanks to his moving rhetoric gained under his Greek tutors, and embarked on quelling rebellion among the Greek cities. His crossing of the Danube, a feat accomplished only Darius of Persia, amazed and inspired his men. From the destruction of Thebes through campaigns into Mesopotamia, Egypt and even India, Alexander was propelled over the next decade, driven by oracles, omens and what Freeman calls pothos, or longing, before he died, possibly by poisoning, still dreaming of his expedition into Arabia.

In a readable, nonacademic narrative, the author capably sketches the powerful legacy of Alexander in spreading the culture of Greece that has proved the foundation for Western civilization.", the influence of Greece on the ancient world would not have been as great as it was, even if his motivation was not to spread Greek culture for beneficial purposes but to unify his empire.

Booklist:

"Even before Alexander's death in 323 BCE, his legend had accelerated, aided considerably by his highly effective skills of self-promotion. Classics professor Freeman has written a compact biography that avoids the pitfalls of romanticizing or 'understanding' the personality of Alexander. It is a well-written, chronological narrative that allows Alexander's remarkable career and achievements to speak for themselves. Philips doesn't ignore the thuggish aspects of Alexander's efforts, but he does correctly place them within the context of the rather nasty world of both Macedonian and Asian political and military struggles. He also pays ample tribute to Alexander's father, Philip, whose diplomatic and military skills molded the disparate hill tribes of Macedonia into the dominant power in Greece. Justifiably, it is Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire and northern India that forms the bulk of the story and reveals his true genius, including his leadership, expertise in siege warfare, and ability to hold together what evolved into a huge, diverse army. General readers will appreciate this fine account of a man truly deserving of the title 'Great.' "

— Jay Freeman

Book of the Month Club:

"In the enthralling new narrative biography, Alexander the Great, Philip Freeman reveals how this relentless and driven man was able to win against all odds and shape the world in which we still live today…He succeeds in making Alexander accessible as never before. Alexander emerges as a fully fleshed-out figure, and the descriptions of his conquests and battles make for riveting reading."

"Lean, learned, and marked by good judgment on every page, Alexander the Great is also a roaring good yarn. Philip Freeman has the eye of someone who has walked in Alexander's footsteps, and he writes with grace and wisdom."

— Barry Strauss, author of The Spartacus War and professor of history, Cornell University

"Fast paced and dramatic, much like Alexander himself, this is a splendid introduction into one of the most dramatic true stories of history."

— Adrian Goldsworthy, author of Caesar: Life of a Colossus and Anthony and Cleopatra

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Old 02-15-2011, 04:47 AM   #4
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I dont think this guy has ever set foot in Greece or Macedonia for that matter.

http://philipfreemanbooks.com/author.html

Author
There's a story I'd like to tell you about my choice to become a Classics professor. In that story I sit as a child at my father's knee listening to tales of Greek gods and heroes, practice conjugating Latin verbs at the dinner table, and dream of the day I could travel to Greece and Rome to see the fabled lands of Plato and Caesar. I'd like to tell that story, but the truth is very different.

When I was a boy, I cared much more about comic books than Homer or Virgil. My father was stationed in Italy for a year when I was twelve. I spent the whole time earning Boy Scout merit badges and bowling with my friends rather than trekking around the country looking at Roman ruins. When I got back to the states and entered high school, I signed up for French rather than Latin because a dead language was the last thing I was interested in.

When I started my first year of college I thought Latin might be fun (and not too hard). I lasted a week before I dropped the class. I just couldn't understand the notion of declensions, verb-final syntax, and the dreaded ablative case. But I eventually gave it another try and persevered. Then I ended up adding Greek, mythology, and archaeology classes to my schedule until I figured out I might as well be a Classics major. By the time I was nearing the end of my undergraduate years, I decided that I wanted to teach in college even though I had never taught anything to anyone up to that point.

After finishing my degree at the University of Texas, I applied to a number of Ph.D. programs. At the last minute, I sent in an application to Harvard. I couldn't believe it that spring when I got the letter from them saying I was accepted.

There's nothing quite as much fun as standing in front of a group of college students and opening new worlds to them. It's such a privilege that I would probably do it for free (don't tell the dean I said that). There's nothing better than sharing stories with bright young people about Achilles and how anger can destroy a person's life; or Odysseus and why he gave up immortality; or Dante and how the worst sin you could ever commit isn't murder, but betrayal of someone who loves you.

I've taught at Boston University, Washington University, and now Luther College in the beautiful hills (yes, hills) of northeast Iowa. I've also been a visiting scholar at the Harvard Divinity School, the American Academy in Rome, and the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C. I've given talks on the ancient world at the Smithsonian Institution and interviews on National Public Radio, but my best audience ever was a class of enthusiastic elementary school students in St. Louis.

A few years ago, I decided that I wanted to share stories about the ancient world with an audience beyond my students, so I started writing books for anyone with a library card. Of course, I still teach full time, run a small Classics department, and attend lots of faculty meetings. Most of my writing is done during the summers and college breaks, or at spare moments between Greek and Latin classes.

I hope you enjoy the books as much as I enjoyed writing them.
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Old 02-15-2011, 05:38 AM   #5
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Voltron just because you don't agree with this guy you have poopoed him He has the highest credentials including a PHD with highest honors..He doesn't need to visit greece he has greece under his thumb.I'm sure you would jump for joy if he said that macedonians are greek but sorry to dissapoint you he does make a clear distinction of the two.He does it in a very narrative way.It's a shame that you guys have to put up with the shit your government dishes out to you to deceive you.

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Old 02-15-2011, 05:39 AM   #6
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Well he made some pretty bold statements George. Thats all im saying.
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Old 02-15-2011, 05:46 AM   #7
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what a crap "study greek philosophy" tctctctc

it makes me wanna puke!
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Old 02-15-2011, 05:50 AM   #8
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Well vultron you have to read the whole book & you will get the meaning.You should read it fully.
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Old 02-15-2011, 06:09 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltron View Post
Well he made some pretty bold statements George. Thats all im saying.
what would the discreet and esteemed prof miller say?
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Old 02-15-2011, 06:12 AM   #10
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We all have our historians Sydney. Thats something we can agree with.
My approach is to look at the facts on the ground, and use common sense.
Occams Razor if you will...
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