Australian Floods Devastate Queensland; heading towards NSW and VIC

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  • Phoenix
    Senior Member
    • Dec 2008
    • 4671

    #46
    OM, make sure your policy covers you against alien abduction...
    and the side effects of anal probing...

    Comment

    • fyrOM
      Banned
      • Feb 2010
      • 2180

      #47
      You have Nothing to attack the logic of the posts so you attack the man with rubbish…this is nothing more than spite…and as previously mentioned because I don’t agree with you on other matters…your words stand as a testament to your spite and stupidity for all to see. At least people can see you for what you are.

      Ne tie stram sto I nosis godineto.

      Your not worth commenting to further.

      Comment

      • fyrOM
        Banned
        • Feb 2010
        • 2180

        #48
        This interesting thing came across my computer which sounds strange but could it have had anything to do with the floods.

        Thai rain making comes to Qld

        A rain-making method developed by Thai king Bhumipol Adulyadej is set to aid Queensland in battles with drought.


        Ron Corben
        August 8, 2010

        AAP

        A rain-making method developed by Thai king Bhumipol Adulyadej is set to aid Queensland in battles with drought after an agreement between the state government and the Thai royal household.

        The Queensland government's access to the rain-making technology, developed by King Bhumipol over the past 30 years, came a year after the state approached the royal household last year.

        As a result, Queensland is set to be the first major region outside Thailand where the rain-making technology will be put into full effect.
        Advertisement: Story continues below

        In the past, Australia had joined other nations requesting information exchange and technology on the technique.

        But Soothiporn Jitmittraparp, secretary general of the National Research Council of Thailand, said similarities in topography in Thailand and Queensland would be beneficial to the success of the project.

        "The climate and geology of Queensland drought area is very similar to some parts of Thailand. So we're quite sure this technology can be used effectively in Queensland," Soothiporn told AAP.

        The technique largely relies on cloud seeding generally undertaken using chemicals that promote the formation of water droplets within the cloud formations.

        The chemical cloud seeding in turn creates clouds with differing temperatures at different altitudes.

        There are several stages in the process, with sodium chloride used in the final stage to trigger rain.

        "If that kind of cloud is set up in a very good condition, then the cloud will condense into water and the rain will begin falling," Soothiporn said.

        In Thailand, the cloud-seeding method has been applied in the largely drought-affected north-east of the country as well as boosting water volume in dams and reservoirs and aiding reforestation programs.

        Mr Soothiporn said the agreement is also set to boost bilateral cooperation between Thailand and Australia in areas of meteorology and weather programs.

        Talks between the state government and the Thai royal household began in 2009 but an agreement was reached only in June.

        It allows for exchange of scientists to study the rain-making methods. The technique was recognised in 2005 and covered by patents in 30 European countries.

        Reports said Queensland Premier Anna Bligh had recently forwarded a letter to King Bhumipol, now 83, acknowledging the assistance for access to the techniques.

        Queensland initially made the request for assistance when the state was more than 35 per cent drought affected in 2009. But heavy rains across the region over the first half of this year has left less than two per cent of coverage still affected.

        Comment

        • fyrOM
          Banned
          • Feb 2010
          • 2180

          #49
          Rain falls as cloud seeding takes off



          # Brian Williams
          # From: The Courier-Mail
          # January 24, 2008 11:00PM

          SHOWERS have fallen after the first two flights of Queensland's cloud seeding trial.

          But scientists have yet to determine whether the precipitation occurred naturally or was caused by the seeding on Wednesday and yesterday.

          Paul Brady, managing director of MIPD, the company doing the seeding, said yesterday that the project would be a success.

          "We believe it works but the scientific level of proof is different to ours," Mr Brady said.

          In a world first, specialised radar equipment was being used to clarify the rainfall observations.

          "We should know within about a month whether the technology is producing results and have full reports in April," Mr Brady said.

          National Centre for Atmospheric Research scientist Roelof Bruintjes rated the flights over southeast Queensland a success but was coy about whether rain had fallen.

          Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.

          End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.

          "Cloud seeders always say, 'There's the rain', but I want to look at the data first," Dr Bruintjes said.

          Two different seeding processes are being tested – glaciogenic, in which silver iodide crystals are used, and hygroscopic, in which salt is applied. Both substances are fired into supercooled water in clouds. Ice accumulates, snowflakes form and then melt to become rain.

          Clouds about 1km in depth were sought for seeding and the next suitable conditions would probably occur on Australia Day.

          Sustainability Minister Andrew McNamara said $7.6 million will be spent on the research over four years.

          "Successful cloud seeding won't solve southeast Queensland's water crisis on its own but would be part of an overall package, including recycling, more efficient water use, desalination and new storage facilities," he said.

          "This project will focus on the Wivenhoe and Somerset dam catchments."

          Seeding would not end droughts but could boost inflows to dams.

          Cloud seeding elsewhere in the world could not automatically be transferred to Queensland because of regional climate, cloud characteristics and topographic differences.

          The southeast's combined dam levels were at 27.59 per cent yesterday and expected to start falling again soon as inflows slow.

          Current La Nina weather patterns will probably afford more opportunities to seed than the previous El Nino year.

          Comment

          • Makedonetz
            Senior Member
            • Apr 2010
            • 1080

            #50
            Prayers go out to the family's being affected from these floods!
            Makedoncite se borat
            za svoite pravdini!

            "The one who works for joining of Macedonia to Bulgaria,Greece or Serbia can consider himself as a good Bulgarian, Greek or Serb, but not a good Macedonian"
            - Goce Delchev

            Comment

            • fyrOM
              Banned
              • Feb 2010
              • 2180

              #51
              People don’t like being treated as mugs. The Floods Levy is wrong and Gillard will and should face a backlash.

              One off levees for extraordinary circumstances are not wrong in themselves but no one I have spoken to can understand how the government can ask for money when they had a mountain of money and absolutely wasted it in the schools building program and the insulation bats program and as no repercussions have been heard from these two disasters a strong suspicion of money being thrown at the governments mates.

              Like one example I heard where a new add-on to a school estimated by builders to be worth no more than 250k was actually paid 900k to the contracting company. This is not the only example just look back on the Today show segments of the time. Another I remember was the news commentator saying how can a new room added to the school cost 250k when you could build a whole house for that amount. Some people and companies made an unbelievable amount of money while the schools are no significantly better off.

              The size of the sums were just so big even a blind person could see there must be something wrong. How did these payments get signed off on as the government must have their own building assessors who must have noticed this. There was a saying going around at the time that the government is trying to push the money out as quickly as possible but then the mismanagement stories came out and people started thinking it’s a mad situation and a good cover to shove money in their mates pockets.

              I had an investment property where an insulation installer confused the tenant who did not speak English well into letting him install insulation as it was from the government and it had to happen. Coincidently I was organising insulation for that property myself with a different installer. When the person I had arranged arrived in the afternoon he found insulation had been installed that morning by the unknown to me installer. I found out the first installer had used fibreglass bats from china which he assured me were ok. I remembered from watching the early morning USA Today show that in the building frenzy before the GFC some builders there had used cheap fibreglass bats from china but which now there was a concern about them containing formaldehyde and that they could be dangerous and that homeowners were know removing them from their roofs and ripping up their wall to remove them from their walls. I certainly did not want an unknown product put into my property even if I was not living in it.

              I found out from Bunnings I could buy Australian made fibreglass bats for 4.50 per square metre retail and from the installer I arrange that the Chinese bats could be purchase for around 1 dollar trade price yet the first installers documentation showed the cost including installation exactly the amount of the rebate the government was giving. Contrast this to the polyester bats which I had arrange which are made of a similar matter to the insides of pillows you use in bed and are perfectly safe to touch with a bare hand or press up against your face were going to cost me 10.00 dollars per square meter. After much argument the first installer agreed to remove his bats so my arranged installer could put the polyester bats in a different day. It quickly dawned on me there must be hundreds of installers abusing the governments system as the rebate was upto a certain figure but if the type of insulation was cheaper or you had less square metres to cover the final price could be cheaper than the full amount of the rebate and the only the lesser installation price should be claimed and likewise if dearer materials were used or you had more square metres to cover the installation price could be greater but only upto the rebate limit could be claimed and the difference in price would be born by the homeowner. It was strange that my 10.00 per square metre polyester bats cost just over the rebate amount fully installed and if I wanted to go cheaper the installer I arranged was offering to install Australian made fibreglass bats for 6.50 per square metre while the first installer wanted to install the cheap Chinese bats for exactly the amount of the rebate. You don’t need to be the smartest person in the world to realise the first installer was abusing the government system and making an enormous fortune in profits so long as he kept his final price to exactly the value of the rebate no questions would be asked no matter what cheap rubbish he installed. Even if using the Australian bats at 6.50 per square metre the first installer was making an additional pure profit of 35 percent let alone if we recall the price of his cheap bats would be far less than the Australian one and hence increasing his profits. This was just wasting money by the government…our money taxpayer money…straight into the exorbitant profit lined pockets of some installers some of whom had just set up shop recently to take advantage of the rebate while honest long time installers were trying to do the right thing.

              The government had a mountain of money and if it had to be spent to stimulate the economy out of the GFC at least a LOT of good could have been done with it and if any was left over it could have been used for disaster recoveries in the future instead the government wasted it all shoving extraordinary amount in the pockets of a few. Did the government care. Who got fired over such a huge debacle…oh yeah Rudd got stabbed in the back by Gillard who was the minister for schools and wasted the money but got a nice promotion to his job as Prime Minister and undoubted pay increase and now has the gall to levy us a new tax because the government doesn’t have enough money. Any wonder the people don’t like her nor the levy. It not out of being miserly or uncaring towards the people of Queensland but not wanting to be taken for mugs by Gillard in what looked like a cash for mates deal. Whose to say she wont do something questionable with this money.

              Comment

              • fyrOM
                Banned
                • Feb 2010
                • 2180

                #52
                Julia Gillard battling flood levy backlash



                January 29, 2011 12:00AM
                JULIA Gillard is fighting to contain a growing public and political backlash against her $5.6 billion flood reconstruction package, as community goodwill from the Queensland disaster threatened to evaporate and one Labor state broke ranks over the rescue plan.

                On a day when the Prime Minister hoped to tap into Australia's spirit of generosity to win support for her one-off tax increase on middle- and high-income earners and spending cuts, she found herself struggling to get on the front foot.

                Ms Gillard was forced to slap down Kristina Keneally after the NSW Premier demanded changes to the proposed $1.8bn levy, claiming it was unfair to Sydneysiders because they faced higher living costs than other Australians.

                Ms Gillard was also dragged into a testy exchange during a radio interview in her home town when Melbourne talkback host Neil Mitchell repeatedly pushed her over Labor's ability to deliver value for money, in the wake of the waste exposed in the $16.2bn Building the Education Revolution program.


                "The federal government will make sure that the guidelines are there and that they're adhered to so that we get value for money," Ms Gillard said. "I've put together a package I believe is right for the nation now. It's full of tough decisions. When I was making them, I knew they would be controversial. I believe it's right. I'm going to get on with doing it."

                Tony Abbott plans today to personalise his attack on Ms Gillard's levy, accusing her of ripping off flood victims, donors and volunteers because of the tax increase. The Opposition Leader will tell a Young Liberals conference on the Gold Coast that Ms Gillard is out of her depth, and her decision to invoke a disaster to justify a one-off tax increase "compounds the wooden demeanour" she exhibited during the floods crisis and her "tin ear afterwards". He will also say there is a "big risk" that Ms Gillard will use responding to the floods as an excuse for fudging or putting off the "decision and delivery" she had promised on the mining tax, a carbon price, border security and hospital reform.

                The government this week announced a two-tiered levy to raise $1.8bn next financial year to ensure the government could meet its election promise to bring the budget back into surplus by 2012-13.

                Wayne Swan yesterday warned the impact of the Queensland floods would wipe 0.5 per cent off economic growth and, because Queensland supplied one-third of the nation's fruit and vegetables, prices would rise, forcing the March-quarter Consumer Price Index 0.25 per cent higher.

                Queensland Premier Anna Bligh bit the bullet yesterday and postponed for two years the signature project of her premiership, the planned $7.75bn Cross-River Rail line, to help the state economy absorb the flood impact.

                Queensland yesterday unveiled its own budget update, revealing that the floods had sliced 1.75 percentage points off state growth and plunged the state budget further into the red, with the deficit forecast to hit $3.96bn for the coming financial year.

                According to early polls, most Australians are against the levy, with The Australian's online poll recording more than 81 per cent of the 12,700 respondents opposed to it. Fairfax's online poll of 50,000 people had 74 per cent giving it the thumbs-down.

                ...
                ...
                ...
                ect

                Comment

                • Risto the Great
                  Senior Member
                  • Sep 2008
                  • 15660

                  #53
                  Originally posted by OziMak View Post
                  I had an investment property where an insulation installer confused the tenant who did not speak English well into letting him install insulation as it was from the government and it had to happen. Coincidently I was organising insulation for that property myself with a different installer. When the person I had arranged arrived in the afternoon he found insulation had been installed that morning by the unknown to me installer. I found out the first installer had used fibreglass bats from china which he assured me were ok. I remembered from watching the early morning USA Today show that in the building frenzy before the GFC some builders there had used cheap fibreglass bats from china but which now there was a concern about them containing formaldehyde and that they could be dangerous and that homeowners were know removing them from their roofs and ripping up their wall to remove them from their walls. I certainly did not want an unknown product put into my property even if I was not living in it.

                  I found out from Bunnings I could buy Australian made fibreglass bats for 4.50 per square metre retail and from the installer I arrange that the Chinese bats could be purchase for around 1 dollar trade price yet the first installers documentation showed the cost including installation exactly the amount of the rebate the government was giving. Contrast this to the polyester bats which I had arrange which are made of a similar matter to the insides of pillows you use in bed and are perfectly safe to touch with a bare hand or press up against your face were going to cost me 10.00 dollars per square meter. After much argument the first installer agreed to remove his bats so my arranged installer could put the polyester bats in a different day. It quickly dawned on me there must be hundreds of installers abusing the governments system as the rebate was upto a certain figure but if the type of insulation was cheaper or you had less square metres to cover the final price could be cheaper than the full amount of the rebate and the only the lesser installation price should be claimed and likewise if dearer materials were used or you had more square metres to cover the installation price could be greater but only upto the rebate limit could be claimed and the difference in price would be born by the homeowner. It was strange that my 10.00 per square metre polyester bats cost just over the rebate amount fully installed and if I wanted to go cheaper the installer I arranged was offering to install Australian made fibreglass bats for 6.50 per square metre while the first installer wanted to install the cheap Chinese bats for exactly the amount of the rebate. You don’t need to be the smartest person in the world to realise the first installer was abusing the government system and making an enormous fortune in profits so long as he kept his final price to exactly the value of the rebate no questions would be asked no matter what cheap rubbish he installed. Even if using the Australian bats at 6.50 per square metre the first installer was making an additional pure profit of 35 percent let alone if we recall the price of his cheap bats would be far less than the Australian one and hence increasing his profits. This was just wasting money by the government…our money taxpayer money…straight into the exorbitant profit lined pockets of some installers some of whom had just set up shop recently to take advantage of the rebate while honest long time installers were trying to do the right thing.
                  I performed a due diligence on a potential lessee for one of my commercial properties. This guy had no assets other than $400,000 in a bank account. He had been in the insulation business for 9 months and had nothing before he started. I did not lease the premises to him because the "real world" does not let a person like him make money like that normally. He was going to start another business after the government stopped the insulation subsidy. I was not going to risk picking up the pieces after he eventually would have realised the government wasn't carrying him.
                  Risto the Great
                  MACEDONIA:ANHEDONIA
                  "Holding my breath for the revolution."

                  Hey, I wrote a bestseller. Check it out: www.ren-shen.com

                  Comment

                  • julie
                    Senior Member
                    • May 2009
                    • 3869

                    #54
                    The exorbitant increases we are facing already in prices is unjust. Paying a levy is a mockery of the Aussie taxpayer. They are projecting a decrease in consumer spending. No shit. Now the government has set a precedent, what constitutes a national disaster, and how the average battler will be taxed to compensate.
                    Major belt tightening times ahead. Labor has the worst track record for not being able to manage funds. The GFC is continually being blamed, over 2 and half years down the track, bullshit. Mismanagement and lack of transparency. Incidentally, I know someone that works in the building industry, and the home insulation scheme was one of the biggest balls up, and cover up, especially with lack of adequate safety, and volatile dangerous products used.
                    Ozimak, interesting posts about the "rain making", how much of that contributed to the La Nina effect , I wonder.
                    "The moral revolution - the revolution of the mind, heart and soul of an enslaved people, is our greatest task."__________________Gotse Delchev

                    Comment

                    • Phoenix
                      Senior Member
                      • Dec 2008
                      • 4671

                      #55
                      Originally posted by julie View Post
                      Ozimak, interesting posts about the "rain making", how much of that contributed to the La Nina effect , I wonder.
                      Did OM's "rain making" post have anything to do with UFO's or the Mayans by any chance...

                      Comment

                      • fyrOM
                        Banned
                        • Feb 2010
                        • 2180

                        #56
                        Originally posted by Phoenix View Post
                        Did OM's "rain making" post have anything to do with UFO's or the Mayans by any chance...
                        lol...teraj...you are like a guy trying to dig his way out of a hole and by digging faster he thinks he will dig himself out sooner.

                        Comment

                        • fyrOM
                          Banned
                          • Feb 2010
                          • 2180

                          #57
                          Originally posted by Phoenix View Post
                          OM, make sure your policy covers you against alien abduction...
                          and the side effects of anal probing...
                          Phoenix scoring points….
                          YouTube - Crazy In & Out Dunk
                          Last edited by fyrOM; 01-31-2011, 10:04 AM.

                          Comment

                          • Phoenix
                            Senior Member
                            • Dec 2008
                            • 4671

                            #58
                            Originally posted by OziMak View Post
                            Phoenix scoring points….
                            YouTube - Crazy In & Out Dunk
                            There can only be one explanation OM...its gotta be the work of aliens and their tractor beams...

                            Comment

                            • Big Bad Sven
                              Senior Member
                              • Jan 2009
                              • 1528

                              #59
                              Originally posted by Phoenix View Post
                              There can only be one explanation OM...its gotta be the work of aliens and their tractor beams...
                              This is starting to sound a lot like Michael Jordans movie "Space Jam". Maybe this another case of life imitating art, or maybe Space Jam was based on a real life story of alien abduction.

                              What do you think Ozimak??

                              Comment

                              • fyrOM
                                Banned
                                • Feb 2010
                                • 2180

                                #60
                                Just in case you didn’t know…

                                Australians pay some of the highest electricity prices in the world, at around 21 cents per kilowatt compared to an average of 12 cents in the United States and 19 cents in the United Kingdom.

                                The finger of blame is being pointed at the generous rebates governments are paying households that generate solar power, of up to 40 cents a kilowatt. A scheme the rest of us subsidise.
                                The latest news and headlines from trusted journalists. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.


                                And the government wants our support.

                                By the way did you notice the large number of corporate donations…many of whom were building material and transport companies…mmm…guess where the government is going to spend the donations and more…it doesn’t take Einstein to figure out it’s a 3 cone shuffle racket…err game.

                                Comment

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