Macedonian Truth Forum   

Go Back   Macedonian Truth Forum > Macedonian Truth Forum > Exposing Lies and Propaganda

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-19-2017, 01:46 PM   #1
tchaiku
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 195
tchaiku is on a distinguished road
Default Griko people are Jews

The Medieval Salento: Art and Identity in Southern Italy




Linda Safran is Associate Professor of Art History in the department of Greek and Latin at The Catholic University of America. She is the author of San Pietro at Otranto: Byzantine Art in South Italy (1992).

https://muse.jhu.edu/book/29014
https://books.google.com/books?id=xY...page&q&f=false

Last edited by tchaiku; 03-19-2017 at 02:08 PM.
tchaiku is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2017, 11:29 PM   #2
Liberator of Makedonija
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 184
Liberator of Makedonija is on a distinguished road
Default

This works with some of the information I put forward a while ago about "Hellene" being a pagan term and how the name "Greek" was not used widely prior to the 19th century. Interesting to point out that the ancient tribe of "Greeks" (not to be confused with the ancient Hellenes or modern Greeks) inhabitated Southern Italy, I believe in what is now modern Calabria
Liberator of Makedonija is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2017, 04:19 AM   #3
Amphipolis
Member
 
Amphipolis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 780
Amphipolis is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tchaiku View Post
Griko people are Jews
You... understood the text you submitted very well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liberator of Makedonija View Post
Interesting to point out that the ancient tribe of "Greeks" (not to be confused with the ancient Hellenes or modern Greeks) inhabitated Southern Italy, I believe in what is now modern Calabria
I'm a little confused. What?
Amphipolis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2017, 10:39 AM   #4
tchaiku
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 195
tchaiku is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amphipolis View Post
You... understood the text you submitted very well.
I should've named the tittle different but the text information is very interesting and puts things in perspective.
tchaiku is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2017, 03:46 AM   #5
tchaiku
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 195
tchaiku is on a distinguished road
Default

_ . Griko is illuminated by considering its use among Jews. After being expelled from Spain in 1492 and from the Salento by the Spanish rulers in 1541, the affected Jews went mostly to Thessalonike, part of the Ottoman Empire, or to Corfu, under Venetian rule. In both places they found Romaniote (formerly Byzantine) Jews, Italian Jews from Rome, Ashkenazim, and Sephardim practicing their distinctive liturgical rites. Visitors to early modern Corfu record that there were communities of Jews of diverse origin that included both gregi—Jews from the Salento who spoke griko—and others from Apulia who used pugghisu, "Puglian: the Salentine Romance vernacular.107 These communities had names derived from their lan-guages: gehillah apulyanit (the Apulian community, using Romance) and yehillah griga, or grip, using Salentine Greek."' The linguistic term was thus a cultural signifier for both Jews and Christians. The ancient Greeks labeled those who did not speak their language barbaroi, "barbarians;' and this term is also used to describe the Libyan heathens in the Byzantine dedication of the rebuilt walls of Taranto [139]." Today, ppoppiti, with the same kind of staccato syllables as barbaroi, is used to describe the inhabitants of the southern Salento by those who live along and beyond its northern limit and speak an Apulian rather than a Salentine dialect 10 Ppoppiti has also come to con-note boorish, unlettered peasants, just as speaking a non-Greek tongue once implied other kinds of cultural and behavioral barbarisms. As usual, when the term is adopted by those who have been identified pejoratively—when it becomes an cmic rather than an etic label—it loses much of its negative force.,,, This chapter has demonstrated ways in which language is a linchpin of identity. Hebrew users were at least bilingual because they were always part of a larger com-munity that did not share their language. Greek and Latin speakers, especially those who lived in a monolingual village, lacked such linguistic pressures, but their verbal interaction is apparent in their public texts nonetheless. Despite the erasure of the Jewish communities of the Salento by the sixteenth century, both the Jews and their sacred language have left traces in the local record. In addition to the toponyms that refer to Jewish streets or neighborhoods, we noted in the previous chapter the derogatory labels Sciutei and Sciudeu applied to the inhabitants of two southern towns.
tchaiku is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump