View Single Post
Old 12-23-2008, 11:49 PM   #38
Soldier of Macedon
Administrator
 
Soldier of Macedon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Macedonian Outpost
Posts: 12,959
Soldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond reputeSoldier of Macedon has a reputation beyond repute
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slovak/Anomaly/Tomas View Post
I can't tell. Until the early 19th century the folk language was not written in Serbia and the old literary Slavianoserbian used the older form "volk". I don't know about Croatian literature. Illyrian has many dialects, the bulk of them called Shtokavian (štokavski) that are separated into Old Shtokavian and Neo-Shtokavian. I do know that most Old Shtokavian use the syllabic /l/ as in "vlk", and have many other older features, that's why they are called Old. These include: slavonski, kosovsko-resavski, timočko-prizrenski (torlački), istočnobosanski, zetsko-sandžački, posavski (slavonski). The Neo-Shtokavian are: šumadijsko-vojvođanski, istočnohercegovački, ikavski zapadni i ikavski istarski. There are also the Chakvian (čakavski) and Kaykavian (kajkavski) dialects spoken in most of Croatia but these are transitional with Slovenian.
The Neo-Shtokavian dialects were used to form the Serbo-Croatian literary standard since they were more universal than the Old Shtokavian dialects. Hence why most people would say "vuk" insead of "vlk" or "volk", but that is not the case in most of rural Illyria where people use primarily their native dialects the cityfolk would have hard time understanding them anyway.
Thanks Slovak, that is some decent information, I think based on that it would be highly unlikely that 'Vukasin' would have been used during that period, Volkasin would have had to have been the older way of saying it.

The sources on Marko are scarce, I believe there may be some Latin sources and documents that speak briefly about him or his father. I will keep my eyes open.
__________________
In the name of the blood and the sun, the dagger and the gun, Christ protect this soldier, a full blooded Macedonian.
Soldier of Macedon is offline   Reply With Quote